elegy


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el·e·gy

 (ĕl′ə-jē)
n. pl. el·e·gies
1. A poem composed in elegiac couplets.
2.
a. A poem or song composed especially as a lament for a deceased person.
b. Something resembling such a poem or song.
3. Music A composition that is melancholy or pensive in tone.

[French élégie, from Latin elegīa, from Greek elegeia, from pl. of elegeion, elegiac distich, from elegos, song, mournful song.]

elegy

(ˈɛlɪdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a mournful or plaintive poem or song, esp a lament for the dead
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) poetry or a poem written in elegiac couplets or stanzas
[C16: via French and Latin from Greek elegeia, from elegos lament sung to flute accompaniment]
Usage: Avoid confusion with eulogy

el•e•gy

(ˈɛl ɪ dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, esp. a lament for the dead.
2. a poem written in elegiac meter.
3. a mournful musical composition.
[1505–15; (< Middle French) < Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, adj. derivative of élegos a lament]

elegy

A serious reflective poem, especially one lamenting a death.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elegy - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines

elegy

noun lament, requiem, dirge, plaint (archaic), threnody, keen, funeral song, coronach (Scot. & Irish), funeral poem a moving elegy for a lost friend
Translations
رثاءقصيدَه رِثائِيّه
elegiklagesangsørgedigt
elegia
elegija
elégiagyászdal
harmljóî, tregaljóî
elegija
elēģija
elégia
elegi

elegy

[ˈelɪdʒɪ] Nelegía f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒi] n (= poem) → élégie f
an elegy for sb → une élégie pour qn

elegy

nElegie f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒɪ] nelegia

elegy

(ˈelidʒi) noun
a song or poem of mourning.
References in classic literature ?
We say, for instance, Gray's Elegy, or Shakespeare's Sonnets.
It is not my business here to write an elegy upon my wife, give a character of her particular virtues, and make my court to the sex by the flattery of a funeral sermon.
But this novel strives for something greater, becoming nothing less than a sad and sweeping elegy for the idea of community, a horrifying signal of what we lost in the twentieth century in the name of economic and social progress.
John Bayley's Elegy is a haunting memoir tracking the gradual disappearance of a beloved, a spirit held onto in memory as her presence slips between the fingers of the moment.
Although he is funny about the failings of other translators ("As we advanced into the elegy as into some movie Africa, the weaknesses of our company became increasingly manifest: the heat is getting to them, the rotten gin, the drums, the flies"), he is not funny when he allows himself five shots at translating one short passage: that is translating with a spray gun, and even so he manages to miss the target.
Jasper Mayne's blunt rebuke in his elegy on Donne is the final move in a competition to out-trope his subject.
Deciding the authorship of A Funeral Elegy seems to me to depend on confirming Donald Foster's finding that Shakespeare shares with A Funeral Elegy "dozens of words that occur nowhere in .
Later in the elegy, Propertius also describes a discus thrust in effortful terms: missile nunc disci pondus in orbe rotat ['now whirls in a circle the flying weight of the discus'].
Though the play has its saccharine moments and eventually loses steam as it juggles too many stories at once, director Joe Mantello and a note-perfect cast of eight make ``Proposals'' a charming elegy not only to missing loved ones but to a cherished, imperfect way of life.
Although epic poetry has ostensibly been rejected in favour of elegy, this couplet tellingly draws upon passages from both elegy and epic: the hexameter recalls two lines of Propertius, 1.
He covers the political eclogues; pastoral, elegy, comedy, and the Georgics; and challenging the very structure of the singing match.
5) After pointing out the structural similarities to elegy in Satan's laments, Frey commented, "To a culture aware of the status of an exiled man, cut off from life's advantages and necessities, the story of Satan's fall must have been richly suggestive.