elegy


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Related to elegy: Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

el·e·gy

 (ĕl′ə-jē)
n. pl. el·e·gies
1. A poem composed in elegiac couplets.
2.
a. A poem or song composed especially as a lament for a deceased person.
b. Something resembling such a poem or song.
3. Music A composition that is melancholy or pensive in tone.

[French élégie, from Latin elegīa, from Greek elegeia, from pl. of elegeion, elegiac distich, from elegos, song, mournful song.]

elegy

(ˈɛlɪdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a mournful or plaintive poem or song, esp a lament for the dead
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) poetry or a poem written in elegiac couplets or stanzas
[C16: via French and Latin from Greek elegeia, from elegos lament sung to flute accompaniment]
Usage: Avoid confusion with eulogy

el•e•gy

(ˈɛl ɪ dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a mournful, melancholy, or plaintive poem, esp. a lament for the dead.
2. a poem written in elegiac meter.
3. a mournful musical composition.
[1505–15; (< Middle French) < Latin elegīa < Greek elegeía, adj. derivative of élegos a lament]

elegy

A serious reflective poem, especially one lamenting a death.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elegy - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines

elegy

noun lament, requiem, dirge, plaint (archaic), threnody, keen, funeral song, coronach (Scot. & Irish), funeral poem a moving elegy for a lost friend
Translations
رثاءقصيدَه رِثائِيّه
elegiklagesangsørgedigt
elegia
elegija
elégiagyászdal
harmljóî, tregaljóî
elegija
elēģija
elégia
elegi

elegy

[ˈelɪdʒɪ] Nelegía f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒi] n (= poem) → élégie f
an elegy for sb → une élégie pour qn

elegy

nElegie f

elegy

[ˈɛlɪdʒɪ] nelegia

elegy

(ˈelidʒi) noun
a song or poem of mourning.
References in classic literature ?
We say, for instance, Gray's Elegy, or Shakespeare's Sonnets.
It is not my business here to write an elegy upon my wife, give a character of her particular virtues, and make my court to the sex by the flattery of a funeral sermon.
Juri Talvet's latest, 375-page collection of poetry, Eesti eleegia ja teisi luuletusi 1981-2012 (Estonian elegy and other poems) comprises a wide selection of poems written since the early 1980s.
The first, which he says is nearly completed, will be titled Monuments To An Elegy, while the second will be called Day For Night.
Specific topics include architectural ecphrasis in Roman poetry, Claudianism in the De Raptu Proserpinae, generic interplays between comedy and elegy in Calpurnian pastoral, Latin elegy and Archaic Greek Elegy, and the generic mobility of the ancient letter collection.
Elegy highlights how the original aims of the invading western forces have largely gone unfulfilled and how the war has helped turn Iraq into a living hell for its gay community.
Matthew Arnold's elegy for Charlotte Bronte, "Haworth Churchyard," includes perhaps the most macrabre image--and embarrassing mistake--of his poetic oeuvre.
But the record and celebration of women's sorrow in an elegy raises this emotion from expected poetic mode to something higher; because of the value invested in elegizing, feminine sorrow now transcends its earthly realm.
In ELEGY, Samuel illustrates how a creature's rigid bones or shell continue to suggest its vanished outer form long after flesh and spirit have moved on.
Pastoral and elegy resemble each other in obvious ways.
Prof Weisman has assembled a team of 38 scholars to look at virtually every aspect of the elegy which remains 'a term of great--if challenging--significance'.
Procedural Elegies also includes one of Retallack's most memorable and important works, 1995's "AID/I/SAPPEARANCE," an elegy for Stefan Fitterman, who died in 1993 from an AIDS-related illness.