elephant tree


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Related to elephant tree: Bursera microphylla
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elephant tree - small tree or shrub of the southwestern United States having a spicy odor and odd-pinnate leaves and small clusters of white flowerselephant tree - small tree or shrub of the southwestern United States having a spicy odor and odd-pinnate leaves and small clusters of white flowers
incense tree - any of various tropical trees of the family Burseraceae yielding fragrant gums or resins that are burned as incense
Bursera, genus Bursera - type genus of Burseraceae; tropical and subtropical American shrubs and trees some yielding timber and gum elemi
References in periodicals archive ?
CULTURE Club members could be in with a chance of winning one of five signed copies of The Elephant Tree, a promising first novel by Newcastle-based writer RD Ronald.
The drive passes through mind-boggling variety of sonoran scenery and a highly diversified plant community that includes growths of saguaro, organ pipe, and senita cacti, as well as a welter of woody plants such as the elephant tree (Busera microphylla), and ironwood (Olneya tesota), a member of the legume family.
A short Allotment House and Elephant Tree walk will be led by Bryan and Dorothy Chambers at 2pm on Sunday from a point half a mile south of White Kirkley, near Frosterley.
Dave Bartles-Smith, the team leader, said: "As a result of a possible sighting of the missing man we concentrated our search on the moorland surrounding the Elephant Trees which is on the Weardale Way footpath.
In some of the canyons of the islands, one can see wild strangler fig trees clinging spiderlike to vertical volcanic ash cliffs painted yellow, black and red, while giant cardon cactus stand straight, reaching for the sky In addition, there are elephant trees, unusual boojum trees and the occasional blossom of a tiny cactus.
This means little to most of us, unless we happen to have seen the rare elephant trees that grow in the Gila and Imperial valleys in our own far Southwest--the only members of the family native to the continental United States.