elephants


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elephants

(ˈɛlɪfənts)
adj
slang Austral drunk; intoxicated
[C20: shortened from elephant's trunk, rhyming slang for drunk]
References in classic literature ?
His mother Radha Pyari,--Radha the darling,--who had been caught in the same drive with Kala Nag, told him, before his little milk tusks had dropped out, that elephants who were afraid always got hurt.
The planter, therefore, hired elephants by ones and twos and threes, and fell to work.
We had no difficulty in finding the broad elephant trail, which Ventvogel, after examination, pronounced to have been made by between twenty and thirty elephants, most of them full-grown bulls.
For according to King Juba, the military elephants of antiquity often hailed the morning with their trunks uplifted in the profoundest silence.
Then they came upon vast tracts extending to the horizon, with jungles inhabited by snakes and tigers, which fled at the noise of the train; succeeded by forests penetrated by the railway, and still haunted by elephants which, with pensive eyes, gazed at the train as it passed.
There's nothing surprising about that, my dear Dick; the elephants of Central Africa are the finest in the world.
There are so great numbers of elephants in Abyssinia that in one evening we met three hundred of them in three troops: as they filled up the whole way, we were in great perplexity a long time what measures to take; at length, having implored the protection of that Providence that superintends the whole creation, we went forwards through the midst of them without any injury.
Anyone at all familiar with elephants will doubt it.
He said there was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was A-rabs there, too, and elephants and things.
A two hours' march brought them close to the vicinity in which the elephants had been seen the previous day.
The king's letter was written in blue characters upon a rare and precious skin of yellowish colour, and these were the words of it: "The King of the Indies, before whom walk a thousand elephants, who lives in a palace, of which the roof blazes with a hundred thousand rubies, and whose treasure house contains twenty thousand diamond crowns, to the Caliph Haroun al Raschid sends greeting.
It was a bold, not to say preposterous, idea to conceive even antediluvian trees, with branches strong enough to bear animals as large as elephants.