elf


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ELF

abbr.
extremely low frequency

elf

 (ĕlf)
n. pl. elves (ĕlvz)
1. A small, often mischievous creature considered to have magical powers.
2.
a. A lively, mischievous child.
b. A usually sprightly or mischievous or sometimes spiteful person.

[Middle English, from Old English ælf; see albho- in Indo-European roots.]

elf

(ɛlf)
n, pl elves (ɛlvz)
1. (European Myth & Legend) (in folklore) one of a kind of legendary beings, usually characterized as small, manlike, and mischievous
2. a mischievous or whimsical child
[Old English ælf; related to Old Norse elfr elf, Middle Low German alf incubus, Latin albus white]
ˈelfˌlike adj

ELF

abbreviation for
(General Physics) extremely low frequency

elf

(ɛlf)

n., pl. elves (elvz).
1. a diminutive being in folklore given to mischievous interference in human affairs.
2. a small or mischievous person, esp. a child.
[before 1000; Middle English, back formation from elven, Old English elfen nymph (i.e., female elf); see elfin]
elf′like`, adj.

ELF

or elf,

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elf - (folklore) fairies that are somewhat mischievouself - (folklore) fairies that are somewhat mischievous
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
faerie, faery, fairy, fay, sprite - a small being, human in form, playful and having magical powers
leprechaun - a mischievous elf in Irish folklore
sandman - an elf in fairy stories who sprinkles sand in children's eyes to make them sleepy
2.ELF - below 3 kilohertz
radio frequency - an electromagnetic wave frequency between audio and infrared
electromagnetic spectrum - the entire frequency range of electromagnetic waves

elf

noun fairy, brownie, hob, pixie, puck, imp, sprite, troll, goblin, leprechaun, hobgoblin Tolkien's world of dwarves, dragons and elves
Translations
جِنّي صَغير مُؤْذٍ
alfnisse
álfur; púki
elfaselfiškaselfų
lauma

elf

[elf] N (elves (pl)) → duende m, elfo m (Nordic Myth) → elfo m

elf

[ˈɛlf] [elves] (pl) nlutin m

elf

n pl <elves> → Elf m, → Elfe f; (mischievous) → Kobold m

elf

[ɛlf] n (elves (pl)) → elfo

elf

(elf) nounplural elves (elvz)
a tiny and mischievous fairy.
ˈelfin adjective
of or like an elf.
References in periodicals archive ?
For ELF MFs, the IARC evaluation of "possibly carcinogenic" was founded on a determination that there was limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans based on its effects on childhood leukemia and "inadequate evidence" in experimental animals (IARC 2002).
The patent-pending ELF feed section, in production for more than a year, is said to eliminate scrap problems and feed roll bearing failure associated with rubber bleed during the extrusion process.
Pertinent Data: The ELF features: light immunity, reverse polarity protection, overload protection and short circuit protection.
The FBI estimates that, since 1996, the ALF and ELF have committed more than 600 criminal acts in the United States, resulting in more than $43 million of destruction.
ELF has made Long Island's North Shore its latest battleground in what it has declared "an unbounded war on urban sprawl," leaving its calling card in the form of arson against new luxury homes and condominiums last December at Mount Sinai and the adjacent towns of Miller Place and Middle Island.
ELF stands for Extremely Low Frequency, but there's nothing elfin about that naval operation.
To be included in the ELF, and EGAD must occur after Nov.
In an earlier draft, the EPA authors concluded that ELF fields appear to represent a "probable human carcinogen," MICROWAVE NEWS reported last week in its May/June issue.
ELF fields exist wherever electricity flows and thus are virtually unavoidable.
As pointed out in the oversight committee's report, most of the research studies found no effects from ELF exposure.
Since then, the role of ELF fields incancer has been debated among those studying electromagnetic fields, with the power industry challenging the existence of such a link.