elicit

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e·lic·it

 (ĭ-lĭs′ĭt)
tr.v. e·lic·it·ed, e·lic·it·ing, e·lic·its
To call forth, draw out, or provoke (a response or reaction, for example): "Interrogators were reportedly frustrated by their inability to elicit useful information from him" (Jane Mayer). See Synonyms at evoke.

[Latin ēlicere, ēlicit- : ē-, ex-, ex- + lacere, to entice.]

e·lic′i·ta′tion n.
e·lic′i·tor n.

elicit

(ɪˈlɪsɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to give rise to; evoke: to elicit a sharp retort.
2. to bring to light: to elicit the truth.
[C17: from Latin ēlicere to lure forth, from licere to entice]
eˈlicitable adj
eˌliciˈtation n
eˈlicitor n

e•lic•it

(ɪˈlɪs ɪt)

v.t.
to draw or bring out or forth; evoke: to elicit a response.
[1635–45; < Latin ēlicitus, past participle of ēlicere to coax, lure out =ē- e- + -licere (see delectable)]
e•lic′i•tor, n.

elicit

- Comes from a Latin stem meaning "draw forth by magic or trickery."
See also related terms for magic.

elicit


Past participle: elicited
Gerund: eliciting

Imperative
elicit
elicit
Present
I elicit
you elicit
he/she/it elicits
we elicit
you elicit
they elicit
Preterite
I elicited
you elicited
he/she/it elicited
we elicited
you elicited
they elicited
Present Continuous
I am eliciting
you are eliciting
he/she/it is eliciting
we are eliciting
you are eliciting
they are eliciting
Present Perfect
I have elicited
you have elicited
he/she/it has elicited
we have elicited
you have elicited
they have elicited
Past Continuous
I was eliciting
you were eliciting
he/she/it was eliciting
we were eliciting
you were eliciting
they were eliciting
Past Perfect
I had elicited
you had elicited
he/she/it had elicited
we had elicited
you had elicited
they had elicited
Future
I will elicit
you will elicit
he/she/it will elicit
we will elicit
you will elicit
they will elicit
Future Perfect
I will have elicited
you will have elicited
he/she/it will have elicited
we will have elicited
you will have elicited
they will have elicited
Future Continuous
I will be eliciting
you will be eliciting
he/she/it will be eliciting
we will be eliciting
you will be eliciting
they will be eliciting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been eliciting
you have been eliciting
he/she/it has been eliciting
we have been eliciting
you have been eliciting
they have been eliciting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been eliciting
you will have been eliciting
he/she/it will have been eliciting
we will have been eliciting
you will have been eliciting
they will have been eliciting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been eliciting
you had been eliciting
he/she/it had been eliciting
we had been eliciting
you had been eliciting
they had been eliciting
Conditional
I would elicit
you would elicit
he/she/it would elicit
we would elicit
you would elicit
they would elicit
Past Conditional
I would have elicited
you would have elicited
he/she/it would have elicited
we would have elicited
you would have elicited
they would have elicited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.elicit - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses)elicit - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
touch a chord, strike a chord - evoke a reaction, response, or emotion; "this writer strikes a chord with young women"; "The storyteller touched a chord"
ask for, invite - increase the likelihood of; "ask for trouble"; "invite criticism"
draw - elicit responses, such as objections, criticism, applause, etc.; "The President's comments drew sharp criticism from the Republicans"; "The comedian drew a lot of laughter"
rekindle - arouse again; "rekindle hopes"; "rekindle her love"
infatuate - arouse unreasoning love or passion in and cause to behave in an irrational way; "His new car has infatuated him"; "love has infatuated her"
prick - to cause a sharp emotional pain; "The thought of her unhappiness pricked his conscience"
fire up, stir up, wake, heat, ignite, inflame - arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred"
stimulate, stir, shake up, excite, shake - stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"
excite - arouse or elicit a feeling
anger - make angry; "The news angered him"
discomfit, discompose, untune, upset, disconcert - cause to lose one's composure
shame - cause to be ashamed
spite, wound, bruise, injure, offend, hurt - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"
overwhelm, sweep over, whelm, overpower, overtake, overcome - overcome, as with emotions or perceptual stimuli
interest - excite the curiosity of; engage the interest of
2.elicit - deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning); "We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant"
construe, interpret, see - make sense of; assign a meaning to; "What message do you see in this letter?"; "How do you interpret his behavior?"
3.elicit - derive by reason; "elicit a solution"
logical system, system of logic, logic - a system of reasoning
deduce, derive, infer, deduct - reason by deduction; establish by deduction

elicit

verb
1. bring about, cause, derive, bring out, evoke, give rise to, draw out, bring forth, bring to light, call forth He was hopeful that his request would elicit a positive response.
2. obtain, extract, exact, evoke, wrest, draw out, extort, educe the question of how far police should go to elicit a confession

elicit

verb
To call forth or bring out (something latent, hidden, or unexpressed):
Translations
يَسْتَنْبِط، يَشْتَخْرِج
fremprovokerefremtvinge
laîa fram
išgautiištraukti
izdibinātizvilināt
vylákať

elicit

[ɪˈlɪsɪt] VT [+ interest] → suscitar; [+ reaction] → provocar
to elicit sth (from sb) [+ reply, support, information] → obtener algo (de algn)
my comment elicited no response from himno respondió a mi comentario

elicit

[ɪˈlɪsɪt] vt [+ response] → obtenir; [+ reaction] → susciter; [+ information] → obtenir; [+ sympathy] → susciter; [+ support] → attirer
In five minutes she had elicited all the family history → En cinq minutes elle avait découvert toute l'histoire de la famille.
to elicit sth from sb [+ response] → obtenir qch de qn; [+ reaction] → susciter qch auprès de qn; [+ information] → obtenir qch de qn; [+ sympathy] → susciter qch de qn; [+ support] → s'attirer qch de qn

elicit

vtentlocken (from sb jdm); supportgewinnen (from sb jds); to elicit public sympathydie Sympathie der Öffentlichkeit gewinnen

elicit

[ɪˈlɪsɪt] vt to elicit sth (from sb) (truth, secret) → strappare qc (a qn); (admission, reply) → ottenere qc (da qn)

elicit

(iˈlisit) verb
to succeed in getting (information etc) from a person, usually with difficulty.
References in periodicals archive ?
We do find that conflict situations tend to be a big elicitor of tears, and that is a form of interpersonal stress," says Bylsma.
The results indicated that residual of human odour on soiled clothes acts as an elicitor of host-seeking behaviour in bed bugs.
Ultraviolet irradiation C (UV-C) is widely known as abiotic elicitor due to its germicidal action in grapes especially in the control of fungal contamination (SCHUMPP et al.
Elicitor use is controversial because plants grow differently in inert substrates, in vitro and soil.
All elicitor treatment increased the soybean seed yield when compared to an untreated control plants.
Glucosidase: An elicitor of herbivoreinduced plant odor that attracts host-searching parasitic wasps.
Specifically, in the factors of elicitor and informant, the method with fewer requirements of person (elicitor and informant) is better.
Evidence for parent-child transmission was observed, with parents of younger children in the presence of a disgust elicitor emoting more disgust to their offspring, and these children showing the greatest behavioral avoidance of the potential contaminants.
Negative emotions can have positive results when they lead individuals to undertakings that alleviate the elicitor, and may have detrimental effects in organizational contexts.
Sin embargo, no se observaron diferencias significativas en el numero de brotes por explante ni en la masa fresca por frasco respecto al control ni entre las concentraciones ensayadas para cada elicitor.