elite


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e·lite

or é·lite  (ĭ-lēt′, ā-lēt′)
n. pl. elite or e·lites or élite or é·lites
1.
a. A group or class of persons considered to be superior to others because of their intelligence, social standing, or wealth: "Auguste Comte ... believed that in the age of science society should be ruled by an elite of scientists" (Lewis A. Coser).
b. A member of such a group: "Elites don't grant us [sociologists] interviews. They don't let us hang out at their country clubs" (Sudhir Venkatesh).
c. The best or most skilled members of a group: the elite of professional tennis.
2. A size of type on a typewriter, equal to 12 characters per linear inch.

[French élite, from Old French eslite, from feminine past participle of eslire, to choose, from Latin ēligere; see elect.]

e·lite′ adj.

elite

(ɪˈliːt; eɪ-) or

élite

n
1. (sometimes functioning as plural) the most powerful, rich, gifted, or educated members of a group, community, etc
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: twelve pitch a typewriter type size having 12 characters to the inch
adj
of, relating to, or suitable for an elite; exclusive
[C18: from French, from Old French eslit chosen, from eslire to choose, from Latin ēligere to elect]

e•lite

or é•lite

(ɪˈlit, eɪˈlit)

n.
1. (often used with a pl. v.) the choice or best of a group, class, or the like.
2. (used with a pl. v.) persons of the wealthiest class.
3. a group of persons exercising authority within a larger group.
4. a 10-point type widely used in typewriters and having 12 characters to the inch. Compare pica 1.
adj.
5. of the best or most select.
[1350–1400; Middle English elit a person elected to office < Middle French e(s)lit past participle of e(s)lire to choose < Vulgar Latin *exlegere, for Latin ēligere; see elect]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elite - a group or class of persons enjoying superior intellectual or social or economic status
upper class, upper crust - the class occupying the highest position in the social hierarchy
elect, chosen - an exclusive group of people; "one of the elect who have power inside the government"
cream, pick - the best people or things in a group; "the cream of England's young men were killed in the Great War"
clerisy, intelligentsia - an educated and intellectual elite
beau monde, bon ton, high society, smart set, society - the fashionable elite
few - a small elite group; "it was designed for the discriminating few"
aristocracy, nobility - a privileged class holding hereditary titles
technocrat - an expert who is a member of a highly skilled elite group
Adj.1.elite - selected as the best; "an elect circle of artists"; "elite colleges"
selected - chosen in preference to another

elite

noun
1. aristocracy, best, pick, elect, cream, upper class, nobility, gentry, high society, crème de la crème (French), flower, nonpareil a government comprised mainly of the elite
aristocracy rabble, dregs, hoi polloi, riffraff
adjective
1. leading, best, finest, pick, choice, selected, elect, crack (slang), supreme, exclusive, privileged, first-class, foremost, first-rate, pre-eminent, most excellent the elite troops of the President's bodyguard

elite

or élite
noun
2. The superlative or most preferable part of something:
Idioms: cream of the crop, flower of the flock, pick of the bunch.
adjective
Translations
نُخْبَه، صَفْوَه
elita
elite
elit
úrval; heldra fólk
elita
seçkin sınıf

elite

élite [eɪˈliːt]
A. Nélite f
B. CPD [group, unit, force] → de élite; [school, university] → de élite, exclusivo

elite

élite [ɪˈliːt]
adj [group] → d'élite; [athlete, player, team] → d'élite; [troops] → d'élite; [institution] → prestigieux/euse
n
the elite → l'élite f
the political elite → l'élite politique
the ruling elite → l'élite dirigeante

elite

n (often pej)Elite f
adjElite-; elite groupElitegruppe f, → Elite f; elite unitEliteeinheit f; elite forceElitetruppe f; elite troopsElitetruppen pl; an elite group of scholarseine Elite der Gelehrten

élite

[eɪˈliːt] nélite f inv

élite

(eiˈliːt) , ((American) i-) noun
(with the) the best or most important people especially within society.
References in classic literature ?
No, it should not be said that he, the selected escort of the elite of Devil's Ford, had to fill himself up with whiskey before they started.
Beneath the hundred thousand women of the elite are a million middle-class women, miserable because they are not of the elite, and trying to appear of it in public; and beneath them, in turn, are five million farmers' wives reading 'fashion papers' and trimming bonnets, and shop-girls and serving-maids selling themselves into brothels for cheap jewelry and imitation seal- skin robes.
The meanest mathematician in Spaceland will readily believe me when I assert that the problems of life, which present themselves to the well-educated -- when they are themselves in motion, rotating, advancing or retreating, and at the same time attempting to discriminate by the sense of sight between a number of Polygons of high rank moving in different directions, as for example in a ball-room or conversazione -- must be of a nature to task the angularity of the most intellectual, and amply justify the rich endowments of the Learned Professors of Geometry, both Static and Kinetic, in the illustrious University of Wentbridge, where the Science and Art of Sight Recognition are regularly taught to large classes of the ELITE of the States.
I discovered, in the course of the conversation, that they were the daughters of a gentleman of very large estate, and belonged to the true elite of the country.
Allegre has taken up her residence again amongst the treasures of art in that Pavilion so well known to the elite of the artistic, scientific, and political world, not to speak of the members of aristocratic and even royal families.
It has also found out that they will entertain a brilliant and distinguished circle of the ELITE of the BEAU MONDE (the fashionable intelligence is weak in English, but a giant refreshed in French) at the ancient and hospitable family seat in Lincolnshire.
He remembered that you have to prove you don't know you have it before you are eligible for Pop [an elite social club at Eton].
As was well known, when Harris Collins performed he performed only for the elite, for the hoi-polloi of the trained-animal world.
As the main body continued the direct course, this little band of the elite, in returning from its wild exhibition of savage contempt, took its place in the rear, with a dexterity and a concert of action that showed the manoeuvre had been contemplated.
Yet there were two or three small airless houses at the entrance end of Mews Street, which went at enormous rents on account of their being abject hangers-on to a fashionable situation; and whenever one of these fearful little coops was to be let (which seldom happened, for they were in great request), the house agent advertised it as a gentlemanly residence in the most aristocratic part of town, inhabited solely by the elite of the beau monde.
Hence, the elite city-building agenda was ultimately limited by commercial-civic leaders' own racism and class chauvinism.
The search for indicators of elite change is deep-seated in the proposition that "in most Arab states, incumbent elite significantly influence the formation of the new elite that will replace them" (p.