elite

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e·lite

or é·lite  (ĭ-lēt′, ā-lēt′)
n. pl. elite or e·lites or élite or é·lites
1.
a. A group or class of persons considered to be superior to others because of their intelligence, social standing, or wealth: "Auguste Comte ... believed that in the age of science society should be ruled by an elite of scientists" (Lewis A. Coser).
b. A member of such a group: "Elites don't grant us [sociologists] interviews. They don't let us hang out at their country clubs" (Sudhir Venkatesh).
c. The best or most skilled members of a group: the elite of professional tennis.
2. A size of type on a typewriter, equal to 12 characters per linear inch.

[French élite, from Old French eslite, from feminine past participle of eslire, to choose, from Latin ēligere; see elect.]

e·lite′ adj.

elite

(ɪˈliːt; eɪ-) or

élite

n
1. (sometimes functioning as plural) the most powerful, rich, gifted, or educated members of a group, community, etc
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: twelve pitch a typewriter type size having 12 characters to the inch
adj
of, relating to, or suitable for an elite; exclusive
[C18: from French, from Old French eslit chosen, from eslire to choose, from Latin ēligere to elect]

e•lite

or é•lite

(ɪˈlit, eɪˈlit)

n.
1. (often used with a pl. v.) the choice or best of a group, class, or the like.
2. (used with a pl. v.) persons of the wealthiest class.
3. a group of persons exercising authority within a larger group.
4. a 10-point type widely used in typewriters and having 12 characters to the inch. Compare pica 1.
adj.
5. of the best or most select.
[1350–1400; Middle English elit a person elected to office < Middle French e(s)lit past participle of e(s)lire to choose < Vulgar Latin *exlegere, for Latin ēligere; see elect]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elite - a group or class of persons enjoying superior intellectual or social or economic status
upper class, upper crust - the class occupying the highest position in the social hierarchy
elect, chosen - an exclusive group of people; "one of the elect who have power inside the government"
cream, pick - the best people or things in a group; "the cream of England's young men were killed in the Great War"
clerisy, intelligentsia - an educated and intellectual elite
beau monde, bon ton, high society, smart set, society - the fashionable elite
few - a small elite group; "it was designed for the discriminating few"
aristocracy, nobility - a privileged class holding hereditary titles
technocrat - an expert who is a member of a highly skilled elite group
Adj.1.elite - selected as the best; "an elect circle of artists"; "elite colleges"
selected - chosen in preference to another

elite

noun
1. aristocracy, best, pick, elect, cream, upper class, nobility, gentry, high society, crème de la crème (French), flower, nonpareil a government comprised mainly of the elite
aristocracy rabble, dregs, hoi polloi, riffraff
adjective
1. leading, best, finest, pick, choice, selected, elect, crack (slang), supreme, exclusive, privileged, first-class, foremost, first-rate, pre-eminent, most excellent the elite troops of the President's bodyguard

elite

or élite
noun
2. The superlative or most preferable part of something:
Idioms: cream of the crop, flower of the flock, pick of the bunch.
adjective
Translations
نُخْبَه، صَفْوَه
elita
elite
elit
úrval; heldra fólk
elita
seçkin sınıf

elite

élite [eɪˈliːt]
A. Nélite f
B. CPD [group, unit, force] → de élite; [school, university] → de élite, exclusivo

elite

élite [ɪˈliːt]
adj [group] → d'élite; [athlete, player, team] → d'élite; [troops] → d'élite; [institution] → prestigieux/euse
n
the elite → l'élite f
the political elite → l'élite politique
the ruling elite → l'élite dirigeante

elite

n (often pej)Elite f
adjElite-; elite groupElitegruppe f, → Elite f; elite unitEliteeinheit f; elite forceElitetruppe f; elite troopsElitetruppen pl; an elite group of scholarseine Elite der Gelehrten

élite

[eɪˈliːt] nélite f inv

élite

(eiˈliːt) , ((American) i-) noun
(with the) the best or most important people especially within society.
References in periodicals archive ?
187) Using Richmond, Virginia as a case study, Hoffman maintains that the authority of urban commercial-civic elites was far from total, and people of color and workers were far from powerless in shaping city growth.
The generation gap between political elites and the majority of the population who are much younger was another factor.
Rael's point here is profoundly important: From at least the 1780s to the early 1800s, white and black elites engaged in open debates about the meaning of the country and the public that constituted it.
One need not multiply examples to show that civilization--especially modern civilization-relies heavily on expertise, which is translated into the functions of specific elites in various and diverse spheres of human needs and activity.
From these names he generates a list of 417 lineages, which he subdivides into an inner elite of 110 consisting of those represented by four or more names in the catasti (which includes nearly all the families who had been members of the priorate more than 25 times), and two lower elites distinguished by a reduced number of appearances in catasti and the priorate.
Burnard thus puts these 461 exemplar elites in circulation with their society and finds them to be relentlessly local in their sensibilities and interested primarily in perpetuating their comfortable status.
The administrative elite is defined here as the provincial elites, especially those from the Sahel, who in the 1930s took over national leadership in Tunisia from the traditional elites in urban areas.
Cuzco is also located in the most heavily Indian portion of the country; the local elites have had to justify their place within the national hierarchy in competition with other regional elites while taking into account an indigenous heritage that people of coastal Peru despised.
When asked why he is the best model of leadership, elites most often say it is his ability to cooperate with other leaders in Latin America and beyond (40%).
As racism grew significantly in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, black elites realized that assimilation was less likely and that their fate "was inextricably tied to that of the entire race.
There was steady renovation and incorporation of new elites, but the latter tended to come particularly from the middle and lower ranks of the aristocracy of northern Spain (and notably Navarre and the Basque Country), and was rapidly and fairly completely absorbed into the traditional elite culture and its functional mores.
Because most of the previous studies of Victorian urban elites have focused on either mercantile cities such as Bristol, Cardiff, and London, or on northern commercial and industrial towns such as "Brum" itself.