elm bark beetle


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elm bark beetle

n.
Either of two bark beetles (Scolytus multistriatus or Hylurgopinus rufipes) that transmit one of the fungi that cause Dutch elm disease.

elm′ bark` bee`tle


n.
1. a shiny, dark reddish-brown European bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus, now widespread in the U.S.: the primary vector of Dutch elm disease.
2. a bark beetle, Hylurgopinus opaculus, of E North America, that also transmits Dutch elm disease.
[1905–10]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pyrethroid insecticides for control of European elm bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).
The Banded Elm Bark Beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in North America: a taxonomic review and modifications to the Wood (1982) key to the species of Scolytus Geoffroy in North and Central America.
e, Pajares & Lanier (1989) reported that pyrethroids did not appear to be highly repellent to European elm bark beetle, but caused rapid knockdown.
This fungal disease, spread by the elm bark beetle, pretty much eradicated the elm tree from our landscape.
The Dutch elm was obliterated decades ago in Worcester by a fungi spread by the elm bark beetle.
of not one but two pests: the European elm bark beetle and Dutch elm disease, a fungus vectored by this bark beetle.
Among the species are emerald ash borer, European Sirex woodwasp, Asian ambrosia beetle, two species of longhorned beetles from China, banded elm bark beetle, and Cydella (Tortricidae) and Chlorophorus (Cerambycidae) from Indian pine cones.
Among these chemicals, they identified four terpene compounds that could elicit neural responses in the antennae of the elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus 7utfipes), which is native to North America and is one of the insects that gives the fungus a lift from tree to tree.
That fungus spread from diseased to healthy trees by natural root grafts and overland by the European elm bark beetle.
The Elm Bark Beetle survived since the original epidemic, which arrived from America by boat in 1968, by clinging to the few trees which have not been felled.
They are susceptible to infection by the fungus, the spores of which are carried by the elm bark beetle.
early detection of non-indigenous pests (traps to capture elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus) in western Canada and to detect the European spruce beetle (Ips typographus) at ports of entry ill Canada and the us).