elocutionist


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el·o·cu·tion

 (ĕl′ə-kyo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The art of public speaking in which gesture, vocal production, and delivery are emphasized.
2. A style or manner of speaking, especially in public.

[Middle English elocucioun, from Latin ēlocūtiō, ēlocūtiōn-, from ēlocūtus, past participle of ēloquī, to speak out : ē-, ex-, ex- + loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]

el′o·cu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
el′o·cu′tion·ist n.

elocutionist

1. a person skilled at public speaking.
2. a teacher of elocution.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elocutionist - a public speaker trained in voice production and gesture and delivery
orator, public speaker, rhetorician, speechifier, speechmaker - a person who delivers a speech or oration
Translations

elocutionist

[ˌeləˈkjuːʃənɪst] Nprofesor(a) m/f de elocución, recitador(a) m/f

elocutionist

nSprecherzieher(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
Come right in and look at our elocutionist, Marilla.
Unfortunately for Anne, a professional elocutionist was staying at the hotel and had consented to recite.
Her gift o' gab is what's goin' to be the makin' of her; mebbe she'll lecture, or recite pieces, like that Portland elocutionist that come out here to the harvest supper.
Usually Watson, who had a remarkably keen sense of hearing, did the listening; and Bell, who was a professional elocutionist, did the talking.
The second, Alexander Melville Bell, was the dean of British elocutionists, a man of creative brain and a most impressive facility of rhetoric.
Thus bad begins; but worse remains behind,' as the Standard Elocutionist says," said Agatha, adding another sentence to her confession.
Wal, I don't profess to be any elocutionist," Salters said.
Apart from his chief vocation of acting, he has also dabbled in painting and poetry, written and directed plays, edited a Bengali magazine, and is also a much-acclaimed elocutionist.
Cliff handed me the name of an elocutionist, "a lady in Cardiff," he said "who doesn't take prisoners".
These conventions, in terms of Siddons's vocal delivery, were learned from the elocutionist Thomas Sheridan, father to Richard.
Stephen Bottomore's essay presents a case study of Eric Williams, a noted actor who toured extensively as a film elocutionist.
One of the men in charge of recruiting writers on both sides of the Atlantic was Sir Gilbert Parker, a Canadian elocutionist, ardent imperialist, and the author of bestselling romantic novels, including The Seats of the Mighty about Wolfe's victory over Montcalm at the conquest of Quebec.