emaciation


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e·ma·ci·ate

 (ĭ-mā′shē-āt′)
tr. & intr.v. e·ma·ci·at·ed, e·ma·ci·at·ing, e·ma·ci·ates
To make or become extremely thin, especially as a result of starvation.

[Latin ēmaciāre, ēmaciāt- : ē-, ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + maciāre, to make thin; see māk- in Indo-European roots.]

e·ma′ci·a′tion n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emaciation - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)emaciation - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)
leanness, spareness, thinness - the property of having little body fat
Translations
تَحْرير، إعْتاق
udmarvningunderernæring
kóros soványság
megurî
bir deri bir kemik kalma

emaciation

[ɪˌmeɪsɪˈeɪʃən] Ndemacración f

emaciation

emaciation

[ɪˌmeɪsɪˈeɪʃn] ndeperimento, dimagrimento

emaciated

(iˈmeisieitid) adjective
having become very thin (through illness, starvation etc).
eˌmaciˈation noun
References in classic literature ?
He gave me an extraordinary impression as he sat there, his attention riveted on his game -- an impression of great strength; and I could not understand why it was that his emaciation somehow made it more striking.
His eyes, prominent from the emaciation of his face, gazed inquiringly at his comrades who were paying no attention to him, and he moaned regularly and quietly.
Thin to emaciation, he seemed a cold flame of a man, a man of a mysterious, chemic sort of flame, who, under a glacier-like exterior, conveyed, somehow, the impression of the ardent heat of a thousand suns.
The bright sun, the brilliant green of the foliage, the strains of the music were for her the natural setting of all these familiar faces, with their changes to greater emaciation or to convalescence, for which she watched.
His legs and thighs were thin, nearly to emaciation, but of extraordinary length; and his knees would have been considered tremendous, had they not been outdone by the broader foundations on which this false superstructure of blended human orders was so profanely reared.
He was slender to emaciation, cavernously checked, roll after roll of skin, no longer encasing flesh or muscle, hanging grotesquely down his neck and swathing the Adam's apple so that only occasionally, with queer swallowing motions, did it peep out of the mummy-wrappings of skin and sink back again from view.
Notwithstanding his years, and his look of emaciation, if not of suffering, there was that about this solitary being, however, which said that time, and not disease, had laid his hand heavily on him.
A formidable warrior, his thin and severe features retained the soldier's fierceness of expression; an ascetic bigot, they were no less marked by the emaciation of abstinence, and the spiritual pride of the self-satisfied devotee.
That look of wan emaciation which anxiety or low spirits often communicates to a thoughtful, thin face, rather long than round, having vanished from hers; a clearness of skin almost bloom, and a plumpness almost embonpoint, softened the decided lines of her features.
It was not the change of emaciation, but that effect which even young faces will very soon show from the persistent presence of resentment and despondency.
Stevie was staring at the horse, whose hind quarters appeared unduly elevated by the effect of emaciation.
This pleased him, but his extreme emaciation converted his self-satisfied smile into a ghastly exhibition of long teeth under the red moustache.