embankment


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em·bank·ment

 (ĕm-băngk′mənt)
n.
1. The act of embanking.
2. A mound of earth or stone built to hold back water or to support a roadway.

embankment

(ɪmˈbæŋkmənt)
n
(Civil Engineering) a man-made ridge of earth or stone that carries a road or railway or confines a waterway. See also levee1

em•bank•ment

(ɛmˈbæŋk mənt)

n.
1. a bank, mound, dike, or the like, raised to hold back water, carry a roadway, etc.
2. the action of embanking.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.embankment - a long artificial mound of stone or earthembankment - a long artificial mound of stone or earth; built to hold back water or to support a road or as protection
levee - an embankment that is built in order to prevent a river from overflowing
hill, mound - structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones; "they built small mounds to hide behind"
bulwark, rampart, wall - an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes; "they stormed the ramparts of the city"; "they blew the trumpet and the walls came tumbling down"
revetement, stone facing, revetment - a facing (usually masonry) that supports an embankment

embankment

noun bank, ridge, mound, causeway, rampart, earthwork They climbed a steep railway embankment.
Translations
جِسْرسَد، حاجِز، رَصيف
násep
dæmningskråningvold
penger
nasip
upphlaîinn kantur; flóîgarîur
堤防
krantinė
krastmala
násyp
vägbank
เขื่อน
đường đáp cao (cho xe lửa)

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] N [of path, railway] → terraplén m; [of canal, river] → dique m

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] n [road, railway] → remblai m, talus m; [river] (made of earth)berge f; (made of concrete)quai m (= dyke) → digue f

embankment

n(Ufer)böschung f; (along path, road) → Böschung f; (for railway) → Bahndamm m; (holding back water) → (Ufer)damm m, → Deich m; (= roadway beside a river)Ufer (→ straße f) nt

embankment

[ɪmˈbæŋkmənt] n (of path) → terrapieno; (of road, railway) → massicciata; (of canal, river) → argine m; (dyke) → diga

embankment

(imˈbӕŋkmənt) noun
a bank or ridge made eg to keep back water or to carry a railway over low-lying places etc.

embankment

جِسْر násep skråning Damm ανάχωμα terraplén penger remblai nasip terrapieno 堤防 dijk voll nabrzeże aterro насыпь vägbank เขื่อน istinat duvarı đường đáp cao (cho xe lửa)
References in classic literature ?
Then it was he discovered that the form of Uncas vanished, and that he beheld only the dark outline of an inequality in the embankment.
The dynamite had dug a ditch more than a hundred feet wide, all around us, and cast up an embankment some twenty-five feet high on both borders of it.
When we came near the churchyard, we had to cross an embankment, and get over a stile near a sluice gate.
To any one understanding the architecture of the edifice, the Persian's action would seem to indicate that Erik's mysterious house had been built in the double case, formed of a thick wall constructed as an embankment or dam, then of a brick wall, a tremendous layer of cement and another wall several yards in thickness.
At last, after nightfall, the artilleryman made a rush for it and got over the railway embankment.
Beside the eastern lake there calls No laughing throng, no lover goes; But in the long embankment walls The willow shade invites repose.
Seriously," said Gondy, astonished at not having further advanced; "I fear that when the torrent has broken its embankment it will cause fearful destruction.
At two o'clock the next day fifty thousand spectators had taken their position upon the Place, around the two gibbets which had been elevated between the Quai de la Greve and the Quai Pelletier; one close to the other, with their backs to the embankment of the river.
When he came abreast of the fantastic embankment known as the Trocadero, he reflected, through his throbbing pain, that he was near Mrs.
The horse cantered on, rose at the embankment of the water-channel, changed leg cleverly on top, and hopped down in a cloud of golden dust.
The Grand Trunk at this point was built on an embankment to guard against winter floods from the foothills, so that one walked, as it were, a little above the country, along a stately corridor, seeing all India spread out to left and right.
It ran on from east to west, shutting out the Channel like a neglected railway embankment, on which no train had ever rolled within memory of man.