embracing


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em·brace

 (ĕm-brās′)
v. em·braced, em·brac·ing, em·brac·es
v.tr.
1. To clasp or hold close with the arms, usually as an expression of affection.
2. To surround or enclose: "the bold chalk ridge that embraces the prominences of Hambledon Hill" (Thomas Hardy).
3. To include or contain as part of something broader. See Synonyms at include.
4. To adopt or support willingly or eagerly: embrace a social cause.
5. To avail oneself of: "I only regret, in my chilled age, certain occasions and possibilities I didn't embrace" (Henry James).
v.intr.
To join in an embrace.
n.
1. An act of holding close with the arms, usually as an expression of affection; a hug.
2. An enclosure or encirclement: caught in the jungle's embrace.
3. Eager acceptance: his embrace of socialism.

[Middle English embracen, from Old French embracer : en-, in; see en-1 + brace, the two arms; see brace.]

em·brace′a·ble adj.
em·brace′ment n.
em·brac′er n.

Embracing

 of carvers: 15th century.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Embracing - the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection)embracing - the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection)
cuddle, nestle, snuggle - a close and affectionate (and often prolonged) embrace
hug, clinch, squeeze - a tight or amorous embrace; "come here and give me a big hug"
clutch, clutches, grip, hold, clasp, clench, grasp - the act of grasping; "he released his clasp on my arm"; "he has a strong grip for an old man"; "she kept a firm hold on the railing"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It was a modern parallel to the case of Ixion embracing a cloud, and was so much the more ridiculous as the Judge prided himself on eschewing all airy matter, and never mistaking a shadow for a substance.
said Eva, in a sort of a rapture, throwing herself on her neck, and embracing her over and over again.
The next moment we were all on shore weeping and embracing for joy, while the rain poured down in torrents.
In the midst of the prayer a fly had lit on the back of the pew in front of him and tortured his spirit by calmly rubbing its hands together, embracing its head with its arms, and polishing it so vigorously that it seemed to almost part company with the body, and the slender thread of a neck was exposed to view; scraping its wings with its hind legs and smoothing them to its body as if they had been coat-tails; going through its whole toilet as tranquilly as if it knew it was perfectly safe.
In another second I was embracing and kissing her rapturously: "Bessie
It was not the thorn bending to the honeysuckles, but the honeysuckles embracing the thorn.
Her darling was a pleasant sight too, embracing her and thanking her, and protesting against her taking so much trouble for her--which last she only dared to do playfully, or Miss Pross, sorely hurt, would have retired to her own chamber and cried.
When it was asleep again, I crept close to my mother's side according to my old custom, broken now a long time, and sat with my arms embracing her waist, and my little red cheek on her shoulder, and once more felt her beautiful hair drooping over me - like an angel's wing as I used to think, I recollect - and was very happy indeed.
There was something so natural and winning in Clara's resigned way of looking at these stores in detail, as Herbert pointed them out, - and something so confiding, loving, and innocent, in her modest manner of yielding herself to Herbert's embracing arm - and something so gentle in her, so much needing protection on Mill Pond Bank, by Chinks's Basin, and the Old Green Copper Rope-Walk, with Old Barley growling in the beam - that I would not have undone the engagement between her and Herbert, for all the money in the pocket-book I had never opened.
Faults in the abstract are each and all so uninviting, not to say alarming, but, associated with certain eyes and hair and tender little gowns, it is curious how they lose their terrors; and, as with vice in the poet's image, we end by embracing what we began by dreading.
But, thou, my poor knave,'' said Cedric, turning about and embracing his Jester, ``how shall I reward thee, who feared not to give thy body to chains and death instead of mine
You are the bright sun of my senses," he said, embracing her.