emergence


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e·mer·gence

 (ĭ-mûr′jəns)
n.
1. The act or process of emerging.
2. A superficial outgrowth of plant tissue, such as the prickle of a rose.

emergence

(ɪˈmɜːdʒəns)
n
1. the act or process of emerging
2. (Botany) an outgrowth, such as a prickle, that contains no vascular tissue and does not develop into stem, leaf, etc

e•mer•gence

(ɪˈmɜr dʒəns)

n.
1. the act or process of emerging.
2. an outgrowth on the surface of a plant.
3. the appearance of new properties or species in the course of evolution.
[1640–50; < French < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emergence - the gradual beginning or coming forth; "figurines presage the emergence of sculpture in Greece"
beginning - the event consisting of the start of something; "the beginning of the war"
rise - a growth in strength or number or importance
2.emergence - the becoming visible; "not a day's difference between the emergence of the andrenas and the opening of the willow catkins"
beginning - the event consisting of the start of something; "the beginning of the war"
eruption - the emergence of a tooth as it breaks through the gum
dissilience - the emergence of seeds as seed pods burst open when they are ripe
3.emergence - the act of emerging
appearance - the act of appearing in public view; "the rookie made a brief appearance in the first period"; "it was Bernhardt's last appearance in America"
4.emergence - the act of coming (or going) out; becoming apparent
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
surfacing - emerging to the surface and becoming apparent
emission, emanation - the act of emitting; causing to flow forth

emergence

noun
1. coming, development, arrival, surfacing, rise, appearance, arising, turning up, issue, dawn, advent, emanation, materialization the emergence of new democracies in Central Europe
2. disclosure, publishing, broadcasting, broadcast, publication, declaration, revelation, becoming known, becoming apparent, coming to light, becoming evident Following the emergence of new facts, the conviction was quashed.

emergence

noun
The act of coming into view:
Translations
بُروز، ظُهور
opdukkentilsynekomst
emergenssiesille tuleminenilmaantuminen
felbukkanás
framkoma, uppkoma
vynorenie
nastanekpojavitev
belirmeortaya çıkma

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːdʒəns] Naparición f

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːrəns] n
[new nation] → naissance f; [industry] → apparition f; [religion, movement] → émergence f
the emergence of sb as sth → l'émergence de qn comme qch
(= coming out) (from house, building) [person] → apparition f

emergence

nAuftauchen nt; (of new nation etc)Entstehung f; (of theory, school of thought)Aufkommen nt

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːdʒns] n (of new ideas, theory) → apparizione f; (of submarine) → emersione f; (of nation) → nascita

emerge

(iˈməːdʒ) verb
1. to come out; to come into view. The swimmer emerged from the water; He was already thirty before his artistic talent emerged.
2. to become known. It emerged that they had had a disagreement.
eˈmergence noun
eˈmergent adjective
being in the process of emerging or developing. the emergent nations.
References in classic literature ?
All its life it had been asleep, but now it hardly got a chance for a nod, so swiftly did big events and crashing surprises come along in one another's wake: Friday morning, first glimpse of Real Nobility, also grand reception at Aunt Patsy Cooper's, also great robber raid; Friday evening, dramatic kicking of the heir of the chief citizen in presence of four hundred people; Saturday morning, emergence as practicing lawyer of the long-submerged Pudd'nhead Wilson; Saturday night, duel between chief citizen and titled stranger.
Palmer, who seemed to feel a relief to himself, in leaving behind him a person so well able to assist or advise Miss Dashwood in any emergence.
Happily, however, there was sleep in Beauvais that night to help them out of it and they passed on once more into solitude and loneliness: jingling through the untimely cold and wet, among impoverished fields that had yielded no fruits of the earth that year, diversified by the blackened remains of burnt houses, and by the sudden emergence from ambuscade, and sharp reining up across their way, of patriot patrols on the watch on all the roads.
At such times the more exuberant among them called out in an excited manner on our emergence round some corner of expectancy, "Here they come
The occasional emergence of an Equilateral from the ranks of his serf-born ancestors is welcomed, not only by the poor serfs themselves, as a gleam of light and hope shed upon the monotonous squalor of their existence, but also by the Aristocracy at large; for all the higher classes are well aware that these rare phenomena, while they do little or nothing to vulgarize their own privileges, serve as a most useful barrier against revolution from below.
There were three circumstances in particular which made me think that its rare emergence above ground was the outcome of a long-continued underground habit.
It was absolutely necessary, therefore, to think of something, and in this emergence recollecting WHEN she had seen him last in Hertfordshire, and feeling curious to know what he would say on the subject of their hasty departure, she observed:
Having thus, amid a general titter, played very prettily with his interrupter, the lecturer went back to his picture of the past, the drying of the seas, the emergence of the sand-bank, the sluggish, viscous life which lay upon their margins, the overcrowded lagoons, the tendency of the sea creatures to take refuge upon the mud-flats, the abundance of food awaiting them, their consequent enormous growth.
Either to assume (1) that the will of the people is always unconditionally transferred to the ruler or rulers they have chosen, and that therefore every emergence of a new power, every struggle against the power once appointed, should be absolutely regarded as an infringement of the real power; or (2) that the will of the people is transferred to the rulers conditionally, under definite and known conditions, and to show that all limitations, conflicts, and even destructions of power result from a nonobservance by the rulers of the conditions under which their power was entrusted to them; or
which proclamation, though grandly formal, and one might almost say heraldic, to hear, was in fact enunciated with her maternal eyes reproachfully glaring on that young lady in the flesh--and in so much of it that she was retiring with difficulty into the small closet under the stairs, apprehensive of the emergence of Mr and Mrs Boffin.
Some children that learned the Exemplars showed the emergence of the Categories.
Our study was prompted by observations that the emergence time of C.