emic


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e·mic

 (ē′mĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to phenomena considered as meaningful structural units within a system such as a language or culture.

[From (phon)emic.]

e′mi·cal·ly adv.

emic

(ˈɛmɪk)
adj
of or relating to the role specific elements play in a significant system (such as linguistics)

e•mic

(ˈi mɪk)

adj.
of or pertaining to a significant unit that functions in contrast with other units in a language or other system of behavior. Compare etic.
[1950–55; extracted from phonemic]
Translations
emisch
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary goal of EMIC, according to Courtois, is to convert--in close collaboration with partners--innovative ideas into technologies that can be used by organizations, companies and individuals, typically within three to six years.
Many emic systems can be viewed as highly developed theories that are in many ways antithetical to Western thought.
So for at least more than a decade, cultural dimensions or etic perspective remains prevalent in cross-cultural comparisons while the emic or culture-specific perspective has been overlooked.
Emic research makes observations using frameworks within a community and maintains an epistemological closeness that could result in a more sympathetic experiential and cultural validity.
For those readers who do not have an Anthropology 101, the condensed explanation is that there are two ways of studying cultures: the emic approach seeks to understand a culture 'from within'; anthropologists do this by living with the target group, where possible 'as a member' of this group.
I have translated emic (folk, members') terms into etic (social sciences, conventional society's) terms by using parentheses following the emic terms--if the emic term is different from conventional usage.
He self-consciously and, I might add, defiantly represented an emic ethnography, one that reflects the values of the culture being described, rather than the traditional etic ethnography, which reflects the values of the newcomer to a culture (Vidich and Lyman 26).
The leap from analysis of recordings to how the Hopi actually hear or conceive their own songs also seemed overly casual to me, not so much because I question List's conclusions as the lack of weight he places on the issue of etic versus emic understandings.
It knows the epistemological dangers of attempting emic immersion, and yet hurdles its own doubts repeatedly.
78) refer to as 'qualitatively distinct' assumptions concerning appropriate business and management practice, Thailand provides, intuitively, fertile ground for the uncovering and explication of influential and prevalent emic cultural concepts in the face of converging global business technology, practices and values (e.
Her research is from an emic perspective and explores the significance of subcultural dress for members of the subculture, focusing on appearance, style, practices, purposes and meanings of the subcultural body.
3 million graduates previously made available by the EMIC to Intac Purun to produce the most comprehensive career development database in China.