emic


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e·mic

 (ē′mĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to phenomena considered as meaningful structural units within a system such as a language or culture.

[From (phon)emic.]

e′mi·cal·ly adv.

emic

(ˈɛmɪk)
adj
of or relating to the role specific elements play in a significant system (such as linguistics)

e•mic

(ˈi mɪk)

adj.
of or pertaining to a significant unit that functions in contrast with other units in a language or other system of behavior. Compare etic.
[1950–55; extracted from phonemic]
Translations
emisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Tender notice number : Identification No-06 EMIC (KJR/2017-18) ID:2018_CEMIB_44376_3
They continue to provide "Go-Live" support to Mohammed and his team, to ensure that Epicor ERP meets the requirements of EMIC and allows them to make continuous process improvements.
The higher the score obtained by EMIC scale higher is the level of perceived stigma.
Keywords Cultural differences * Emic and etic * Poland and Germany * Qualitative methodology
Therefore, dog bone geometry with a rectangular section area and a flat side was utilized to favor the use of DIC technique coupled with the UTM EMIC DL 10000 having a 10 kN load cell (Fig.
Masdar Carbon has provided EMIC with the necessary expertise to register the project under the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the project is expected to generate Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) equivalent to the reduction of about 1.
In an effort to study both emic and etic dimensions of religious coping, the study also examines these responses within the framework of Pargament and colleagues' (1998; 2000) religious coping constructs to determine responses that are consistent with findings across other cultures (eric) and to identify and describe responses that are culturally specific to Guatemala and Kenya (emic).
EMIC is to develop projects that cut greenhouse gas emissions such as fuel switching, gas pipeline leakage reduction and gas flare reduction.
Questioning the value of commonly used terms such as 'Theravada', 'state religion' or 'syncretism', he gives us an important perspective on the emic terms and categories used in (mainly Thai and Pali) historical documents and thereby reveals the 'hybridism' (p.
employment of the Buddhist emic ideology of worldly/trans-worldly beings
Some of the pre-qualified training service providers include BIBF, Berlitz, Gulf Academy, GII, EMIC, Golden Trust, NIT and others.
It might equally be claimed that any knowledge about the aesthetic and cultural significance of a particular Maori cloak can come only from an emic (insider) intimacy, a knowledge essentially unavailable to others, including Westerners.