eminent


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em·i·nent

 (ĕm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Well-known and respected, especially for achievement in a particular field: an eminent historian. See Synonyms at famous.
2.
a. Outstanding or remarkable: handled the situation with eminent skill.
b. Being such in full measure; complete; absolute: "the eminent sanity, good-humor and judgement you always display in pushing matters you have at heart" (Theodore Roosevelt).
3. Towering or standing out above others; prominent: an eminent peak.

[Middle English, from Latin ēminēns, ēminent-, present participle of ēminēre, to stand out : ē-, ex-, ex- + -minēre, to jut out; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

em′i·nent·ly adv.

eminent

(ˈɛmɪnənt)
adj
1. above others in rank, merit, or reputation; distinguished: an eminent scientist.
2. (prenominal) noteworthy, conspicuous, or outstanding: eminent good sense.
3. projecting or protruding; prominent
[C15: from Latin ēminēre to project, stand out, from minēre to stand]

em•i•nent

(ˈɛm ə nənt)

adj.
1. high in station, rank, or repute; distinguished.
2. greatest; utmost: eminent fairness.
3. lofty; high.
4. prominent; jutting: an eminent nose.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin ēminent-, s. of ēminēns outstanding]
em′i•nent•ly, adv.

eminent

- Can mean "projecting, protruding" and is based on Latin eminere, "project."
See also related terms for projecting.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eminent - standing above others in quality or position; "people in high places"; "the high priest"; "eminent members of the community"
superior - of or characteristic of high rank or importance; "a superior ruler"
2.eminent - of imposing height; especially standing out above others; "an eminent peak"; "lofty mountains"; "the soaring spires of the cathedral"; "towering icebergs"
high - (literal meaning) being at or having a relatively great or specific elevation or upward extension (sometimes used in combinations like `knee-high'); "a high mountain"; "high ceilings"; "high buildings"; "a high forehead"; "a high incline"; "a foot high"

eminent

eminent

adjective
Translations
بارِز، مُتَفَوِّق
fremragendefremtrædende
mikils metinn, áberandi, frægur
eminencijagarsumasiškilusįžymumasypač
ievērojamsizcils

eminent

[ˈemɪnənt] ADJ
1. (= distinguished) [doctor, scientist] → eminente, ilustre
she is eminent in the field of avionicses una eminencia en el campo de la aviónica
2. (frm) (= great) [charm, fairness, good sense] → extraordinario
she was chosen for her eminent suitability for the jobla eligieron por ser sumamente idónea para el puesto

eminent

[ˈɛmɪnənt] adj [scientist, historian, surgeon, scholar] → éminent(e)

eminent

adj
(= distinguished, prominent) personangesehen, bedeutend; to be eminent in a particular fieldauf einem bestimmten Gebiet führend sein
(form: = notable) → ausgesprochen; you showed eminent good sense in coming to uses war ausgesprochen vernünftig von Ihnen, zu uns zu kommen; in an eminent degreein ausgesprochen hohem Maße

eminent

[ˈɛmɪnənt] adj (person) → eminente, insigne; (quality) → eccellente

eminent

(ˈeminənt) adjective
outstanding; distinguished; famous. an eminent lawyer.
ˈeminence
1. distinction; fame.
2. a title of honour used to or of a cardinal. His Eminence Cardinal Kelly.
ˈeminently adverb
very. eminently suitable.
References in classic literature ?
They had been doing this for some time, when an Eminent Statesman stuck his head out of the pool of politics, and, speaking for the members of his profession, said:
AN eminent Justice of the Supreme Court of Patagascar was accused of having obtained his appointment by fraud.
For your Fortune, and Merit both, have been Eminent.
is its abundant illustrative quotations from eminent poets, chief of
When the citizens at large govern for the public good, it is called a state; which is also a common name for all other governments, and these distinctions are consonant to reason; for it will not be difficult to find one person, or a very few, of very distinguished abilities, but almost impossible to meet with the majority [1279b] of a people eminent for every virtue; but if there is one common to a whole nation it is valour; for this is created and supported by numbers: for which reason in such a state the profession of arms will always have the greatest share in the government.
I ran across him in the street and congratulated him on the knighthood with which his eminent services during the war had been rewarded.
Very different was the treatment of the eminent Mrs.
Kind old Grandfather had made him a present of a volume of engraved portraits, representing the features of eminent and famous people o f all countries.
As truth distinguishes our writings from those idle romances which are filled with monsters, the productions, not of nature, but of distempered brains; and which have been therefore recommended by an eminent critic to the sole use of the pastry-cook; so, on the other hand, we would avoid any resemblance to that kind of history which a celebrated poet seems to think is no less calculated for the emolument of the brewer, as the reading it should be always attended with a tankard of good ale--
Let me make two eminent personages known to one another: Mr.
On the contrary, the news came that the Bell Company had secured two eminent lawyers and were ready to give battle.
It is certain that several of our eminent breeders have, even within a single lifetime, modified to a large extent some breeds of cattle and sheep.