emolument


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e·mol·u·ment

 (ĭ-mŏl′yə-mənt)
n.
Payment for an office or employment; compensation.

[Middle English, from Latin ēmolumentum, gain, originally a miller's fee for grinding grain, from ēmolere, to grind out : ē-, ex-, ex- + molere, to grind; see melə- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

emolument

(ɪˈmɒljʊmənt)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the profit arising from an office or employment, usually in the form of fees or wages
[C15: from Latin ēmolumentum benefit; originally, fee paid to a miller, from ēmolere, from molere to grind]

e•mol•u•ment

(ɪˈmɒl yə mənt)

n.
compensation, as fees or tips, from employment; recompense.
[1470–80; < Latin ēmolumentum advantage, benefit, derivative of ēmolere to produce by grinding]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emolument - compensation received by virtue of holding an office or having employment (usually in the form of wages or fees); "a clause in the U.S. constitution prevents sitting legislators from receiving emoluments from their own votes"
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)

emolument

noun
Translations
أجْر، أتْعاب، راتِب
honorarlønsalær
laun; hagnaîur, gróîi
atlyginimaspajamos
atalgojumsienākumi

emolument

[ɪˈmɒljʊmənt] N (often pl) (frm) (= salary) → emolumentos mpl; (= fees) → honorarios mpl

emolument

n usu pl (form)Vergütung f; (= fee)Honorar nt; (= salary)Bezüge pl

emolument

[ɪˈmɒljʊmənt] n (often pl) (frm) → emolumento

emolument

(iˈmoljumənt) noun
profit made from employment, salary, fees etc.
References in classic literature ?
Customers came in, as the forenoon advanced, but rather slowly; in some cases, too, it must be owned, with little satisfaction either to themselves or Miss Hepzibah; nor, on the whole, with an aggregate of very rich emolument to the till.
If he made a fair use of his opportunities in China, he would come back, while still a young man, fit for a position of trust and emolument, and justified in looking forward, at no distant date, to a time when the House would assist him to start in business for himself.
I replied, with all due deference to his experience (but with more deference, I am afraid, to his being Dora's father), that perhaps it was a little nonsensical that the Registry of that Court, containing the original wills of all persons leaving effects within the immense province of Canterbury, for three whole centuries, should be an accidental building, never designed for the purpose, leased by the registrars for their Own private emolument, unsafe, not even ascertained to be fire-proof, choked with the important documents it held, and positively, from the roof to the basement, a mercenary speculation of the registrars, who took great fees from the public, and crammed the public's wills away anyhow and anywhere, having no other object than to get rid of them cheaply.
Among the most formidable of the obstacles which the new Constitution will have to encounter may readily be distinguished the obvious interest of a certain class of men in every State to resist all changes which may hazard a diminution of the power, emolument, and consequence of the offices they hold under the State establishments; and the perverted ambition of another class of men, who will either hope to aggrandize themselves by the confusions of their country, or will flatter themselves with fairer prospects of elevation from the subdivision of the empire into several partial confederacies than from its union under one government.
The payment for writing had so decreased that he found it impossible to employ assistance; he was forced, therefore, to work a much longer time himself to obtain the same emolument.
No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States; and no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.
It is a lucrative source of emolument, and sometimes brings into the national treasury as much as thirty-five or forty dollars a year.
My genteel walk in life led me away from all immediate sources of emolument, and my father could only afford to give me an allowance which was too preposterously small to be mentioned.
Chairman and Gintlemen," said the Other, "it sames to me, and I'm hopin' yez wull approve the suggistion, that an appropriet way to honour the mimory of the decaised would be to erect an emolument sootably inscribed wid his vartues.
He was one of the best-natured fellows in the world, and was, at the same time, master of so much pleasantry and humour, that he was reputed the wit of the country; and all the neighbouring gentlemen were so desirous of his company, that as denying was not his talent, he spent much time at their houses, which he might, with more emolument, have spent in his school.
When everybody had eaten as much as possible, the cloth was removed, bottles, glasses, and dessert were placed on the table; and the waiters withdrew to 'clear away,'or in other words, to appropriate to their own private use and emolument whatever remnants of the eatables and drinkables they could contrive to lay their hands on.
The besom of reform hath swept him out of office, and a worthier successor wears his dignity and pockets his emoluments.