emotion


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e·mo·tion

 (ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.

[French émotion, from Old French, from esmovoir, to excite, from Vulgar Latin *exmovēre : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.]

emotion

(ɪˈməʊʃən)
n
any strong feeling, as of joy, sorrow, or fear
[C16: from French, from Old French esmovoir to excite, from Latin ēmovēre to disturb, from movēre to move]

e•mo•tion

(ɪˈmoʊ ʃən)

n.
1. an affective state of consciousness in which joy, sorrow, fear, etc., is experienced, as distinguished from cognitive and volitional states of consciousness.
2. any of the feelings of joy, sorrow, hate, love, etc.
3. a strong agitation of the feelings caused by experiencing love, fear, etc.
[1570–80; appar. < Middle French esmotion, derived on the model of movoir: motion, from esmovoir to set in motion, move the feelings < Vulgar Latin *exmovēre, for Latin ēmovēre; see e-, move, motion]
e•mo′tion•less, adj.
syn: See feeling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emotion - any strong feelingemotion - any strong feeling      
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
CER, conditioned emotion, conditioned emotional response - an emotional response that has been acquired by conditioning
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
reverence, veneration, awe, fear - a feeling of profound respect for someone or something; "the fear of God"; "the Chinese reverence for the dead"; "the French treat food with gentle reverence"; "his respect for the law bordered on veneration"
anxiety - a vague unpleasant emotion that is experienced in anticipation of some (usually ill-defined) misfortune
joy, joyfulness, joyousness - the emotion of great happiness
love - a strong positive emotion of regard and affection; "his love for his work"; "children need a lot of love"
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
emotional state, spirit - the state of a person's emotions (especially with regard to pleasure or dejection); "his emotional state depended on her opinion"; "he was in good spirits"; "his spirit rose"

emotion

noun
2. instinct, sentiment, sensibility, intuition, tenderness, gut feeling, soft-heartedness the split between reason and emotion

emotion

noun
A complex and usually strong subjective response, such as love or hate:
Translations
إنْفِعالعَاطِفَةعاطِفَه
emocepocit
følelsesindsbevægelse
tunne
emocija
érzésindulat
geîshræring
感情
감정
emocijaemocinisemocionaliaiemocionalusjausmas
emocijasjūtassaviļņojums
dojatieemócia
čustvo
känsla
อารมณ์
cảm xúc

emotion

[ɪˈməʊʃən] N
1. (= passion) → emoción f
her voice trembled with emotionsu voz temblaba de emoción
he never shows any emotionnunca deja ver ninguna emoción
the split between reason and emotionla división entre la razón y los sentimientosel conflicto entre los dictados de la mente y del corazón
2. (= sensation) (eg happiness, love, fear, anger) → sentimiento m
he struggled to control his emotionsluchaba para controlar sus sentimientos

emotion

[ɪˈməʊʃən] n
(= feeling) → sentiment m
Guilt is an extremely negative emotion → La culpabilité est un sentiment extrêmement négatif.
reason vs emotion → la raison contre les sentiments
to express one's emotions → exprimer ses sentiments
(= strong feeling) → émotion f
Her voice trembled with emotion → Sa voix tremblait d'émotion.
to speak with emotion → parler avec émotion
to be overcome with emotion [person] → être terrassé(e) par l'émotion
to show no emotion → ne montrer aucune émotion

emotion

n
Gefühl nt, → Emotion f, → Gefühlsregung f; to dissociate emotion from reasonVerstand und Gefühl trennen
no pl (= state of being moved)(Gemüts)bewegung f, → Bewegtheit f; to show no emotionunbewegt bleiben; in a voice full of emotionmit bewegter Stimme; there was absolutely no emotion in his voiceseine Stimme war völlig emotionslos

emotion

[ɪˈməʊʃn] nemozione f; (love, jealousy) → sentimento

emotion

(iˈməuʃən) noun
1. a (strong) feeling of any kind. Fear, joy, anger, love, jealousy are all emotions.
2. the moving or upsetting of the mind or feelings. He was overcome by/with emotion.
eˈmotional adjective
1. of the emotions. Emotional problems are affecting her work.
2. (negative unemotional) causing or showing emotion. an emotional farewell.
3. (negative unemotional) (of a person) easily affected by joy, anger, grief etc. She is a very emotional person; She is very emotional.
eˈmotionally adverb

emotion

عَاطِفَة pocit følelse Gefühl συναίσθημα emoción tunne émotion emocija emozione 感情 감정 emotie følelse emocja emoção эмоция känsla อารมณ์ duygu cảm xúc 情绪

e·mo·tion

n. emoción, sentimiento intenso.

emotion

n emoción f
References in classic literature ?
They all drew to the fire, Mother in the big chair with Beth at her feet, Meg and Amy perched on either arm of the chair, and Jo leaning on the back, where no one would see any sign of emotion if the letter should happen to be touching.
They don't show much emotion, but they have deep feelings.
I never came upon the place without emotion, and in all that country it was the spot most dear to me.
Edna bit her handkerchief convulsively, striving to hold back and to hide, even from herself as she would have hidden from another, the emotion which was troubling--tearing--her.
Then, Hawkeye," he continued, betraying his deep emotion, only by permitting his voice to fall to those low, guttural tones, which render his language, as spoken at times, so very musical; "then, Hawkeye, we were one people, and we were happy.
THAT day," said Jessie briskly; "the day he just gloved your hand with kisses, and then fled wildly into the forest to conceal his emotion.
It is a likeness of a young man, in a silken dressing-gown of an old fashion, the soft richness of which is well adapted to the countenance of reverie, with its full, tender lips, and beautiful eyes, that seem to indicate not so much capacity of thought, as gentle and voluptuous emotion.
His face darkened with some powerful emotion, which, nevertheless, he so instantaneously controlled by an effort of his will, that, save at a single moment, its expression might have passed for calmness.
I knew the next day that a letter containing the key had, by the first post, gone off to his London apartments; but in spite of--or perhaps just on account of--the eventual diffusion of this knowledge we quite let him alone till after dinner, till such an hour of the evening, in fact, as might best accord with the kind of emotion on which our hopes were fixed.
It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life.
The undertaker, instructed to spare no expense, provided long-tailed black horses, with black palls on their backs and black plumes upon their foreheads; coachmen decorated with scarves and jack-boots, black hammercloths, cloaks, and gloves, with many hired mourners, who, however, would have been instantly discharged had they presumed to betray emotion, or in any way overstep their function of walking beside the hearse with brass-tipped batons in their hands.
He tried a dozen times to express his gratitude to me, but his voice choked with emotion and he could not speak, and yet he had, as I was to later learn, a reputation for ferocity and fearlessness as a fighter that was remarkable even upon warlike Barsoom.