deprivation

(redirected from emotional deprivation)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

dep·ri·va·tion

 (dĕp′rə-vā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of depriving; loss.
b. The condition of being deprived; privation.
2. A removal of rank or office.

deprivation

(ˌdɛprɪˈveɪʃən)
n
1. an act or instance of depriving
2. the state of being deprived: social deprivation; a cycle of deprivation and violence.

dep•ri•va•tion

(ˌdɛp rəˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of depriving.
2. the fact of being deprived.
3. loss.
4. privation.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deprivation - a state of extreme povertydeprivation - a state of extreme poverty    
impoverishment, poorness, poverty - the state of having little or no money and few or no material possessions
2.deprivation - the disadvantage that results from losing something; "his loss of credibility led to his resignation"; "losing him is no great deprivation"
disadvantage - the quality of having an inferior or less favorable position
3.deprivation - act of depriving someone of food or money or rights; "nutritional privation"; "deprivation of civil rights"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
pauperisation, pauperization, impoverishment - the act of making someone poor
starving, starvation - the act of depriving of food or subjecting to famine; "the besiegers used starvation to induce surrender"; "they were charged with the starvation of children in their care"

deprivation

noun
1. lack, denial, deficiency, withholding, robbing, withdrawal, removal, expropriation, divestment, dispossession, deprival Millions suffer from sleep deprivation caused by long work hours.
2. want, need, hardship, suffering, distress, disadvantage, oppression, detriment, privation, destitution Single women with children are likely to suffer financial deprivation.

deprivation

noun
The condition of being deprived of what one once had or ought to have:
Translations
حِرْمان، تَجْريدخَسارَه، صُعوبَه
strádánízbaveníztráta
afsavnberøvelsefratagelse
megfosztásnélkülözés
missirsvipting
zbavenie
mahrumyoksunyoksun/mahrum bırakma

deprivation

[ˌdeprɪˈveɪʃən] N (Psych) (= act) → privación f; (= state) → necesidad f
he lived a life of deprivationvivía en la necesidadvivió una vida llena de privaciones
the deprivations of the past thirty yearslas privaciones de los últimos treinta años
sleep deprivationfalta f de sueño
social deprivationmarginación f social

deprivation

[ˌdɛprɪˈveɪʃən] n
(= poverty) → privation f
social deprivation (= poverty) → misère f sociale
(= loss) → manque m, privation f
sleep deprivation → manque de sommeil

deprivation

n
(= depriving)Entzug m; (= loss)Verlust m; (Psych) → Deprivation f; (of rights)Beraubung f
(= state)Entbehrung f; (= lack of necessities)Mangel m; the deprivations of the wardie Entbehrungen des Krieges

deprivation

[ˌdɛprɪˈveɪʃn] n (act) → privazione f; (state) → indigenza

deprive

(diˈpraiv) verb
(with of) to take something away from. They deprived him of food and drink.
deprivation (depriˈveiʃən) noun
1. (a condition of) loss, hardship etc.
2. (an) act of depriving.
deˈprived adjective
suffering from hardship etc, under-privileged. deprived areas of the city.

dep·ri·va·tion

n. deprivación, pérdida o ausencia de una parte o function.

deprivation

n privación f; androgen — privación de andrógenos; sleep — privación de(l) sueño
References in periodicals archive ?
Emotional deprivation is recognized as a serious public health concern in developing countries.
For Pakistan, the shutdown of cricket relations with India has brought not only cultural and emotional deprivation but also financial loss, because it has cut them off from the colossal revenues generated from Indian media.
Individuals with an emotional deprivation schema believe that their emotional needs for affection, being understood, and protection cannot be met by others.
We should also not forget that the young people perpetrating this serious abuse have often themselves experienced significant emotional deprivation and other forms of abuse.
Yet contact with the outside world is of particular importance for these juvenile detainees, "many of whom may have behavioral problems related to emotional deprivation or a lack of social skills," the CPT points out.
Individuals may feel lonely at work if they experience emotional deprivation and a lack of social companionship (Wright, 2007).
Again feeling the horror of deprivation, this time the deprivation of migrancy and the emotional deprivation that Maz might feel upon losing his mother, the therapist challenges Sally to think about Maz's possible feelings at losing her and how she might feel leaving him.
If anxiety felt in the womb has such an impact, it follows that emotional deprivation in childhood will have dire results.
We suspect that orphans who suffered early years of physical, mental and emotional deprivation tend not to render it at all.
She wades into arguments about working mothers, is highly critical of mass-produced nursery care, and towards the end of the book offers a number of radical but realistic policy ideas for avoiding emotional deprivation in the next generation of British children (something she argues should be taken as seriously as material deprivation).
Sustaining him through sensual and emotional deprivation are the memories of his beloved foster family and the discovery that he can climb a tree and view the colourful, busy world outside the fortress-like Hospital walls.
The argument goes that where a youngster is deprived of love and guidance at home, and especially where there is abuse, that child will invariably suffer from social and emotional deprivation.