emotivism

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emotivism

(ɪˈməʊtɪˌvɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) ethics the theory that moral utterances do not have a truth value but express the feelings of the speaker, so that murder is wrong is equivalent to down with murder. Also called: boo-hurrah theory Compare prescriptivism, descriptivism
References in periodicals archive ?
Contra Weber and his fellow emotivists, Barbalet (2001:29-61) argues that emotions can be rational and demonstrates that the operation of instrumental reason presupposes the work of "background emotions" (like satisfaction in one's work, pride in one's skills, etc.
Emotivists also argue that there is no rational way to conclusively end a dispute.
While those who think right or wrong are a matter of emotions, or attitude of a group, are termed emotivists.
Too quiet and rational to attract the attention of the loquacious emotivists crowned evanescent monarchs in our media age, Pinkerton's work holds up well in a higher standard of judgment with a longer historical sense.
Hume says no; anticipating the moral emotivists, he says that moral predicates merely express our own (subjective) reaction to (objective) properties in the world.
Only briefly considered is the prospect that Moore (or any other defender of the OQA or NF precept: for example, emotivists or other latter-day noncognitivists) might have in mind an inductive generalization from the above verbal behavior.