germ

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germ

 (jûrm)
n.
1. Biology A small mass of protoplasm or cells from which a new organism or one of its parts may develop.
2. The earliest form of an organism; a seed, bud, or spore.
3. A microorganism, especially a pathogen.
4. Something that may serve as the basis of further growth or development: the germ of a project.

[Middle English, bud, from Old French germe, from Latin germen; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

germ

(dʒɜːm)
n
1. (Pathology) a microorganism, esp one that produces disease in animals or plants
2. (often plural) the rudimentary or initial form of something: the germs of revolution.
3. (Biology) a simple structure, such as a fertilized egg, that is capable of developing into a complete organism
[C17: from French germe, from Latin germen sprig, bud, sprout, seed]

germ

(dʒɜrm)

n.
1. a microorganism, esp. when disease-producing; microbe.
2. a bud, offshoot, or seed.
3. the rudiment of a living organism; an embryo in its early stages.
4. the initial stage in development or evolution, as a germ cell or ancestral form.
5. a source of development; origin; seed: the germ of an idea.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French germe < Latin germen shoot, sprout, by dissimilation from *genmen=gen- (see genus) + -men resultative n. suffix)]
germ′like`, adj.

germ

(jûrm)
1. A microscopic organism or substance, especially a bacterium or a virus, that causes disease.
2. The earliest living form of an organism; a seed, spore, or bud.
Usage You've heard it many times. Some food falls on the floor, and someone (usually an adult) says, "Don't eat that now. It has germs on it." The word germ has been used to refer to invisible agents of disease since the 19th century, when scientists were first learning about the nature of disease. Similarly, the term microbe, which comes from the Greek prefix mikro-, "small," and word bios, "life," is a term that arose in the late 19th century in reference to the microscopic organisms that caused disease. The terms germ and microbe thus became associated with an early era of scientific research in which knowledge was very limited, and they are no longer used much by scientists. Thanks to generations of research, scientists today can usually identify the specific agents of disease, such as individual species of bacteria or viruses. When they want to refer generally to agents of disease, they use the term pathogen, which comes from Greek pathos, "suffering," and the suffix -gen, "producer." The term microorganism is used to refer to any one-celled microscopic organism, whether it causes disease or is harmless.

germ

, germinate - From Latin germen, "seed, sprout."
See also related terms for sprout.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.germ - anything that provides inspiration for later work
inspiration - arousal of the mind to special unusual activity or creativity
taproot - something that provides an important central source for growth or development; "the taproot of his resentment"; "genius and insanity spring from the same taproot"
muse - the source of an artist's inspiration; "Euterpe was his muse"
2.germ - a small apparently simple structure (as a fertilized egg) from which new tissue can develop into a complete organism
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
3.germ - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium)germ - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size

germ

noun
1. microbe, virus, bug (informal), bacterium, bacillus, microorganism a germ that destroyed hundred of millions of lives
2. beginning, root, seed, origin, spark, bud, embryo, rudiment The germ of an idea took root in her mind.
Related words
fear spermaphobia, spermatophobia

germ

noun
1. A minute organism usually producing disease:
2. A source of further growth and development:
Translations
أصْل، بدايَةجُرْثُومةجُرْثومَه
bacilbakteriemikrobzárodek
bakteriekimmikrobespire
bakteeri
mikrob
angi, vísir, kveikjasÿkill
細菌
병원균
mikrobasužuomazga
baktērijaiedīgļimikrobssākums
mikrob
bacill
เชื้อโรค
vi trùng

germ

[dʒɜːm]
A. N (Bio) (fig) → germen m (Med) → microbio m, germen m
the germ of an ideael germen de una idea
B. CPD germ carrier Nportador(a) m/f de microbios or gérmenes
germ cell Ncélula f germinal
germ plasm Ngermen m plasma
germ warfare Nguerra f bacteriológica

germ

[ˈdʒɜːrm] n
(MEDICINE)microbe m, germe m
[wheat] → germe m
(= beginning) the germ of an idea → le germe d'une idée

germ

n (lit, fig)Keim m; (of particular illness also)Krankheitserreger m; (esp of cold) → Bazillus m; don’t spread your germs aroundbehalte deine Bazillen für dich

germ

:
germ carrier
nBazillenträger m
germ cell
n (Biol) → Keimzelle f
germ-free
adjkeimfrei

germ

:
germ-killer
germ layer
n (Biol) → Keimblatt nt
germproof
adjkeimsicher, keimfrei
germ warfare
nbakteriologische Kriegsführung, Bakterienkrieg m

germ

[dʒɜːm] n (Med) → microbo (Bio) (also) (fig) → germe m

germ

(dʒəːm) noun
1. a very tiny animal or plant that causes disease. Disinfectant kills germs.
2. the small beginning (of anything). the germ of an idea.

germ

جُرْثُومة bacil bakterie Keim μικρόβιο germen bakteeri microbe mikrob germe 細菌 병원균 ziektekiem bakterie zarodek germe микроб bacill เชื้อโรค mikrop vi trùng 细菌

germ

n. microorganismo, bacteria causante de enfermedades; germ-free, estéril, axénico; libre de microorganismos;
___ cellcélula reproductora.

germ

n germen m, microbio; (of a seed) germen m; wheat — germen de trigo