encampment

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en·camp·ment

 (ĕn-kămp′mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of encamping.
b. The state of being encamped.
2. A camp; a campsite.

encampment

(ɪnˈkæmpmənt)
n
1. the act of setting up a camp
2. the place where a camp, esp a military camp, is set up

en•camp•ment

(ɛnˈkæmp mənt)

n.
1. an act or instance of encamping; lodgment in a camp.
2. the place or quarters occupied in camping; camp.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encampment - a site where people on holiday can pitch a tentencampment - a site where people on holiday can pitch a tent
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"
2.encampment - temporary living quarters specially built by the army for soldiersencampment - temporary living quarters specially built by the army for soldiers; "wherever he went in the camp the men were grumbling"
boot camp - camp for training military recruits
hutment - an encampment of huts (chiefly military)
laager, lager - a camp defended by a circular formation of wagons
military quarters - living quarters for personnel on a military post
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
3.encampment - the act of encamping and living in tents in a campencampment - the act of encamping and living in tents in a camp
inhabitancy, inhabitation, habitation - the act of dwelling in or living permanently in a place (said of both animals and men); "he studied the creation and inhabitation and demise of the colony"

encampment

noun camp, base, post, station, quarters, campsite, bivouac, camping ground, cantonment a large military encampment
Translations
forlægninglejr
táborhely
tjaldbúîir; herbúîir
nometne
kampordugâh

encampment

[ɪnˈkæmpmənt] Ncampamento m

encampment

[ɪnˈkæmpmənt] n [soldiers] → campement m; [troops] → cantonnement m

encampment

nLager nt

encampment

[ɪnˈkæmpmənt] naccampamento

encampment

(inˈkӕmpmənt) noun
a place where troops etc are settled in or camp.
References in classic literature ?
The tribe, or rather half tribe, of Delawares, which has been so often mentioned, and whose present place of encampment was so nigh the temporary village of the Hurons, could assemble about an equal number of warriors with the latter people.
On that morning when Magua led his silent party from the settlement of the beavers into the forests, in the manner described, the sun rose upon the Delaware encampment as if it had suddenly burst upon a busy people, actively employed in all the customary avocations of high noon.
The news spread from mouth to mouth, until the whole encampment became powerfully agitated.
A gipsy encampment to-day is little more than a moving slum, a scab of squalor on the fair face of the countryside.
The road ran through and a little higher than the encampment, which occupied both sides of it.
As he spoke, the indignant chief pointed in the direction of Ishmael's encampment, leaving the trapper no reason to doubt, that the superior industry and sagacity of this man had effected a discovery, which had eluded the search of the rest of his party.
The three advanced in a line with the encampment of the travellers, until, in the dim light by which they were seen, their dusky forms were nearly lost to the eyes of the prisoners.
His position enabled him to bring the whole encampment, with its tent, wagons, and lodges, into a dark but clearly marked profile; furnishing a clue by which the practised warrior was led to a tolerably accurate estimate of the force he was about to encounter.
The Tonquin shortly afterwards made her way through the intricate channel, an came to anchor in the little bay, and was saluted from the encampment with three volleys of musketry and three cheers.
M'Dougal was fain to land, and establish his quarters at the encampment, where he could exercise his rights and enjoy his dignities without control.
They had with them their wives and children, which incapacitated them from any bold and extensive enterprise of a warlike nature; but when, in the course of their wanderings they came in sight of the encampment of Fontenelle, who had moved some distance up Green River valley in search of the free trappers, they put up tremendous war-cries, and advanced fiercely as if to attack it.
The Blackfeet said nothing of the late battle, of which Fontenelle had as yet received no accounts; the latter, however, knew the hostile and perfidious nature of these savages, and took care to inform them of the encampment of Captain Bonneville, that they might know there were more white men in the neighborhood.