enchondroma

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Related to enchondromas: chondrosarcoma

enchondroma

(ˌɛnkənˈdrəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a benign cartilaginous tumour, most commonly in the bones of the hands or feet
[C19: New Latin from Greek, from en-2 + khondros cartilage]
ˌenchonˈdromatous adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enchondroma - benign slow-growing tumor of cartilaginous cells at the ends of tubular bones (especially in the hands and feet)
Translations
Enchondrom
enkondrom

en·chon·dro·ma

n. encondroma, tumor que se desarrolla en un hueso.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here we present an interesting case of Maffucci syndrome with a history of malignant transformation of enchondromas and recurrent hemangiomas that required multiple prophylactic surgical excisions.
2) Although they usually occur spontaneously, they may also arise as a result of malignant degeneration of an endochondroma, as seen in both Maffucci syndrome (a mesodermal dysplasia that causes enchondromas and hemangiomas) and Ollier disease (which manifests as multiple enchondromas).
Ollier's disease also confers an increased risk of malignancy, with transformation of the enchondromas into chondrosarcomas being noted, most often around age 40.
In fact, radiographs of the hands and feet are often pathognomonic in Maffucci syndrome, showing multiple soft tissue masses containing phleboliths in addition to the multiple enchondromas (14).
Background: Enchondromas are usually solitary benign lesions, consisting of ectopic hyaline cartilage deposits in intramedullary bone.
Some lesions, such as solitary bone cysts (Figure 4), enchondromas (Figure 5), EG and Ewing's sarcoma, tend to be centrally located.
Enchondromas are hyaline cartilage tumors in the medullary canal.
Enchondromatosis, or Ollier's disease, is a rare, nonhereditary dyschondroplasia characterized by multiple, asymmetrical enchondromas throughout the skeleton.
If arising within the medullary cavity, they are known as enchondromas.
Chondrosarcomas may arise de novo (primary), or superimposed (secondary) upon preexisting cartilaginous lesions, such as enchondromas or osteochondromas.
Cartilaginous tumors (such as osteochondromas, enchondromas, and chondrosarcomas) may produce irregularly shaped calcifications within their matrix that resemble popcorn on imaging studies (Figure 16).