enchondroma

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Related to enchondromatosis: chondromyxoid fibroma, Maffucci syndrome

enchondroma

(ˌɛnkənˈdrəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a benign cartilaginous tumour, most commonly in the bones of the hands or feet
[C19: New Latin from Greek, from en-2 + khondros cartilage]
ˌenchonˈdromatous adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enchondroma - benign slow-growing tumor of cartilaginous cells at the ends of tubular bones (especially in the hands and feet)
Translations
Enchondrom
enkondrom

en·chon·dro·ma

n. encondroma, tumor que se desarrolla en un hueso.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Classification of Macrodactyly with Associated Conditions Subtype Associated Distinguishing Conditions Features True Proteus syndrome Connective tissue nevi, Macrodactyly epidermal nevi, disproportionate growth False Ollier's disease Enchondromatosis, Macrodactyly cerebral tumours Maffucci's syndrome Enchondromatosis, haemangioma Milroy's disease Congenital lymphedema Klippel-Trenaunay Port wine haemangioma, syndrome varicose veins, soft tissue/bone hypertrophy Vascular malformati on Neurofibro matosis Table 2: Review of Literature of Macrodactyly Sl.
Juvenile GCTs are exceedingly rare but can also be associated with mesodermal dysplastic syndromes characterized by the presence of enchondromatosis and hemangioma formation, such as Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.
The differential diagnosis of hereditary multiple exostoses includes the enchondromatosis, which are a heterogeneous group of syndromes that present with multiple enchondromas associated with pathological fractures, pseudarthrosis, limb shortening, malignant transformation risk, and scoliosis.
Enchondromatosis is characterized by the proliferation of enchondromas-benign intramedullary cartilaginous tumors that occur near the growth plate in long bones.
Juvenile granulosa cell tumor in a 13-year-old girl with enchondromatosis (Ollier's disease): a case report.