enculturation


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

enculturation

(ɛnˌkʌltʃʊˈreɪʃən)
n
(Sociology) another word for socialization
enculturative adj

enculturation

the process by which a person adapts to and assimilates the culture in which he lives.
See also: Society
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enculturation - the adoption of the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture; "the socialization of children to the norms of their culture"
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
cultivation - socialization through training and education to develop one's mind or manners; "her cultivation was remarkable"
bringing up, fosterage, fostering, nurture, rearing, upbringing, breeding, raising - helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
References in periodicals archive ?
They include the place of sexuality for young women of the current generation, the institution of marriage and the changing roles of women in it, how migration and or immigrants affect women and the new roles they play as immigrants that many times force enculturation.
This narrative has gained importance and strength over the last few years because medical education is now considered a process of moral enculturation, a type of socialization achieved not so much through a structured curriculum as through medical educators which above all also involves the inculcation of distinctive medical morality1.
Many of the 'skills' that will be needed are more like personality characteristics, like curiosity, or social skills that require enculturation to take hold," wrote Stowe Boyd, managing director of Another Voice, which provides research on the new economy.
This has led to the enculturation of a myopic and parochial governance mindset, clearly demonstrated by local politicos who can only be bothered by short-term projects that have an immediate and perceptible impact.
The second volume consists of 13 chapters that address key social problems like mental health, acculturation and enculturation, racism, education, social class, climate change, natural disasters, immigration, technological change, bias in the criminal justice and legal system, war and peace, and the highly populated world, while the third contains 13 chapters that focus on problems that affect human health and quality of life, including psychiatric disorders, physical health disparities, cultural marginalization and disability, eating behavior and obesity, aging and caretaking of family members, intergenerational transmission of trauma, addiction, depression and suicide, interpersonal violence, and HIV and AIDS.
Teacher socialization is a complex and complicated subject which deals with the education, learning, practices, professional development and enculturation of teachers, particularly the beginning teachers.
The participants also recommended the increased application of ICTs in teaching and research to ensure enculturation of quality in higher education and bring excellence in innovation and R and D in universities.
It introduces new questions about children's enculturation via media and its entanglement with parental agency using a multi-layered comparison of two different periods' key debates: one about high versus low culture reading material in the nineteen fifties and its successor about politicization of children's media in the late sixties and early seventies.
physiological and cognitive expectancies, acculturation, enculturation, discrimination, mental health problems, and gender socialization) on heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related problems in this demographic.
24) Enculturation and acculturation were measured using the Vancouver Index (25) and were controlled for in models given that each has been associated with discrimination and substance use.
In the United States, acculturation is described as one group adopting the mainstream culture, whereas enculturation is the retention of one's culture of origin (Berry, 1998; Kim et ah, 2001).
In chapter 7, Katherine Brucher discusses the enculturation of shared musical and social values by band members as a localized symbol of Covoes, Portugal.