encyclopaedist


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Related to encyclopaedist: embarkation, heading, unallocated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encyclopaedist - a person who compiles information for encyclopedias
compiler - a person who compiles information (as for reference purposes)
Translations

encyclopaedist

encyclopedist [enˌsaɪkləʊˈpiːdɪst] Nenciclopedista mf
References in periodicals archive ?
2) The Roman encyclopaedist Pliny the Elder, who devoted Book 34 of his Natural History to bronze, reports the claim that there were 3,000 Greek bronzes at Rhodes, and as many at Athens, Olympia and Delphi.
The remarkable Vincenzo Coronelli (16501718), encyclopaedist, geographer, inventor and Doctor of Theology, was citizen of the Republic of Venice.
This way of thinking, as Chateau notes, invites comparison with the Encyclopaedist philosophers.
Pacioli was the greatest encyclopaedist of the Renaissance in the context of this new mathematics and also in the context of Venice which, in the 15th century was the New York of the world and its Rialto was the Wall Street.
The Iranian philosopher also stands out as an Encyclopaedist.
2) sources from antiquity, such as the renowned Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus, claim that Herophilus also practised vivisection.
The sixteenth century encyclopaedist Joachim Fortius believed that "if a student wished to make progress, he should arrange to give lessons daily in the subjects which he was studying, even if he had to hire pupils" (Gartner 15, ital.
39) Other contexts are under the surface, especially the lively medieval debates about literal bodily resurrection, in which the twelfth-century theologian, encyclopaedist and author of a commentary on The Song of Songs, Honorius Augustodunensis (probably named from Autun), was a major figure.
The main sources are Galen of Pergamum who wrote mainly from a medical point of view, Athenaeus of Naucratis, a food encyclopaedist, Plutarch of Chaeronea, and Pliny.
Polanyi's description of what he calls the "objectivist" maps directly onto MacIntyre's encyclopaedist.
It seems fitting that this review of the articles published over the last 40 years in the Australian Journal of Social Issues on the broad topic of social security and social welfare should begin with an article by the great encyclopaedist of the Australian welfare system, T.
Raukas' role with one word, we call him an encyclopaedist.