encyclopedist


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en·cy·clo·pe·dist

 (ĕn-sī′klə-pē′dĭst)
n.
1. A person who writes for or compiles an encyclopedia.
2. Encyclopedist One of the writers of the French Encyclopédie (1751-1772), including its editors, Diderot and d'Alembert.

encyclopedist

(ɛnˌsaɪkləʊˈpiːdɪst) or

encyclopaedist

n
(Professions) a person who compiles or contributes to an encyclopedia
enˌcycloˈpedism, enˌcycloˈpaedism n

en•cy•clo•pe•dist

or en•cy•clo•pae•dist

(ɛnˌsaɪ kləˈpi dɪst)

n.
1. a compiler of or contributor to an encyclopedia.
2. (often cap.) one of the collaborators on a French encyclopedia published in the 18th century, presenting the views of the Enlightenment.
[1645–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encyclopedist - a person who compiles information for encyclopedias
compiler - a person who compiles information (as for reference purposes)
Translations
enciklopedist
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the great encyclopedist of the Mamluk era, Shihab al-Din Ahmad al-Nuwayri (d.
Anyone who would fall into the encyclopedist temptation of trying to explaining everything, to exhaust knowledge rather than treat science as an open, ever-expanding enterprise, will be made to pay the price.
The change in attitude of the prominent German-American political philosopher, encyclopedist, and reformer Francis Lieber toward Napoleon provides a case in point.
Brown finds an original defensiveness about the study of insects, one "variously but consistently refashioned by nearly every insect encyclopedist ever since" to reveal "a number of anxieties about the relationship between humans and insect," and that renders the insect "a kind of Other not only for human beings but for animals and animal studies as well.
Speth's particular talent--evident here as in his earlier books--is that he's a kind of encyclopedist.
This is a herculean task, and Glut is one of the few authors with the energy and experience as an encyclopedist to pull it off.
The great intellectuals of their age including Ibn Rushid (Avicenna) the encyclopedist, Ibn Miskawayah, the historian-philosopher, Al-Fadl Ibn Naubakht and Humayun Ibn Ishaq, the renowned translators, who were entrusted with the responsibility for the organisation and maintenance of libraries.
In Cevdet Bey and His Sons, Omer, who returns to Istanbul with a youthful sense of enthusiasm after completing his engineering studies in London, and, in The House of Silence, Selahattin, the Enlightenment era throwback encyclopedist, both eventually fall into despair and choose to lead reclusive lives.
Flint over the existence or absence of practicing astrologers in the early Middle Ages, based on varying interpretations that he and Flint have of a passage in the seventh century by encyclopedist Isidore of Seville (xvii-xx), alluding to this discussion again much later in the text (105).
18) In the early seventh century, the encyclopedist Isidore of Seville made it clear that he too considered both the universe and the earth to be spherical, and his text remained a fundamental source for knowledge about the natural world through the Middle Ages.
Richard von Krafft-Ebing, the famed 19th century encyclopedist of sexual practices, called homosexuality a "degenerative sickness.
Other layers are skillfully peeled back in Makdisi's "new history": the class dimension behind the Ottoman millet system and its gradual unraveling as a result of Western pressure and Ottoman reforms after 1850; the evolution of missionary goals and philosophy as schools and hospitals begin to compensate for the missionaries' dismal failure to see conversions; and finally, the unintended consequence of that educational mission in the person of Protestant convert, teacher, and encyclopedist Butrus al-Bustani, who, half a century after As'ad's death, penned a biography of As'ad that radically subverts both the racial and national superiority of the American missionaries and the self righteous conservatism of the Maronites with his discourse of "dialogue within and across cultures" (p.