endemic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

en·dem·ic

 (ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in or limited to a particular locality, region, or people: diseases endemic to the tropics.
2. Native to or limited to a certain region: endemic birds.
3. Common in or inherent to an enterprise or situation: "All the difficulties endemic to historical research become more acute in the case of war" (Constantine Pleshakov).
n.
An endemic plant or animal.

[From Greek endēmos, native, endemic : en-, in; see en-2 + dēmos, people; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemic

(ɛnˈdɛmɪk)
adj
present within a localized area or peculiar to persons in such an area
n
(Biology) an endemic disease or plant
[C18: from New Latin endēmicus, from Greek endēmos native, from en-2 + dēmos the people]
enˈdemically adv
ˈendemism, ˌendeˈmicity n

en•dem•ic

(ɛnˈdɛm ɪk)

adj. Also, en•dem′i•cal.
1. natural to or characteristic of a particular place, people, etc.: an endemic disease; endemic unemployment.
2. belonging exclusively or confined to a particular place: a species of bat endemic to Mexico.
n.
3. an endemic organism or disease.
[1655–65; < New Latin endēmicus= Greek éndēm(os) endemic (en- en-2 + -demos, adj. derivative of dêmos people) + Latin -icus -ic]
en•dem′i•cal•ly, adv.
en′de•mism (-dəˌmɪz əm) n.

en·dem·ic

(ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
1. Found in or confined to a particular location, region, or people. Malaria, for example, is endemic to tropical regions.
2. Ecology Native to a particular region or environment and not occurring naturally anywhere else. The giant sequoia is endemic to California. Compare alien, indigenous.
Usage A disease that occurs regularly in a particular area, as malaria does in many tropical countries, is said to be endemic. The word endemic, built from the prefix en-, "in or within," and the Greek word demos, "people," means "within the people (of a region)." A disease that affects many more people than usual in a particular area or that spreads into regions in which it does not usually occur is said to be epidemic. This word, built from the prefix epi-, meaning "upon," and demos, means "upon the people." In order for a disease to become epidemic it must be highly contagious, that is, easily spread through a population. Influenza, better known as the flu, has been the cause of many epidemics throughout history. Epidemics of waterborne diseases such as cholera often occur after natural disasters such as earthquakes and severe storms that disrupt or destroy sanitation systems and supplies of fresh water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endemic - a disease that is constantly present to a greater or lesser degree in people of a certain class or in people living in a particular location
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
2.endemic - a plant that is native to a certain limited area; "it is an endemic found only this island"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
Adj.1.endemic - of or relating to a disease (or anything resembling a disease) constantly present to greater or lesser extent in a particular locality; "diseases endemic to the tropics"; "endemic malaria"; "food shortages and starvation are endemic in certain parts of the world"
ecdemic - of or relating to a disease that originates outside the locality in which it occurs
epidemic - (especially of medicine) of disease or anything resembling a disease; attacking or affecting many individuals in a community or a population simultaneously; "an epidemic outbreak of influenza"
2.endemic - native to or confined to a certain region; "the islands have a number of interesting endemic species"
bionomics, environmental science, ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
cosmopolitan, widely distributed - growing or occurring in many parts of the world; "a cosmopolitan herb"; "cosmopolitan in distribution"
3.endemic - originating where it is foundendemic - originating where it is found; "the autochthonal fauna of Australia includes the kangaroo"; "autochthonous rocks and people and folktales"; "endemic folkways"; "the Ainu are indigenous to the northernmost islands of Japan"
native - characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin; "the native North American sugar maple"; "many native artists studied abroad"

endemic

adjective widespread, common, sweeping, extensive, prevalent, rife, pervasive Polio was then endemic among children of my age.

endemic

adjective
Existing, born, or produced in a land or region:
Translations
مُسْتَوْطِن
endemisk
endeeminenkotoperäinen
endémiásendemikus
landlægur
endeminis
endēmisks, vietējs
endemický

endemic

[enˈdemɪk] ADJendémico

endemic

[ɛnˈdɛmɪk] adj
(MEDICINE) [illness] → endémique
[racism, poverty, corruption, problem] → endémique
to be endemic to sth → être endémique de qch, être endémique dans qch

endemic

adj (lit, fig)endemisch; endemic toendemisch in (dat); petty embezzling seems to be endemic herekleine Unterschlagungen scheinen hier eine Krankheit zu sein

endemic

[ɛnˈdɛmɪk] adjendemico/a

endemic

(enˈdemik) adjective
(of a disease etc) regularly found in people or a district owing to local conditions. Malaria is endemic in/to certain tropical countries.

en·dem·ic

a. endémico-a, rel. a una enfermedad que permanece por un tiempo indefinido en una comunidad o región;
___ areaárea ___;
___ diseaseenfermedad ___;
___ relapsing feverfiebre recurrente ___.

endemic

adj endémico
References in classic literature ?
He has no business in this quarter, unless it be curiosity, which is an endemic in these woods.
in spite of the tergiversations which were endemic, and, it might be said, inevitable, at that period.
And something did, for the next summer was made memorable by the prevalence of a mysterious disease--epidemic, endemic, or the Lord knows what, though the physicians didn't--which carried away a full half of the population.
If we turn to nature to test the truth of these remarks, and look at any small isolated area, such as an oceanic island, although the total number of the species inhabiting it, will be found to be small, as we shall see in our chapter on geographical distribution; yet of these species a very large proportion are endemic,--that is, have been produced there, and nowhere else.
Sclater, informs me that this is the case with the Strix punctatissima and Pyrocephalus nanus; and probably with the Otus Galapagoensis and Zenaida Galapagoensis: so that the number of endemic birds is reduced to twenty-three, or probably to twenty-one.
But a number of other occult manifestations like asthmatic bronchitis, pulmonary eosinophilia, recurrent URI, pneumonia, pain in abdomen and mono-arthritis of filarial origin in filarial endemic areas remain undiagnosed because of lack of suitable diagnostic tool (1).
These are sometimes referred to as endemic species.
In the United States, H capsulatum is endemic to the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys (1,2,5,8) but is not known to be endemic to the Rocky Mountain region (8).
On the occasion of Endemic Bird Day ( May 9), close to 50 bird enthusiasts fanned out across Delhi, Noida and Gurgaon to spot these indigenous beauties in a first- of- its- kind exercise in the region.
Prior to our study it was only Taylor (1921) who published a paper focusing on patterns of plant endemism on the Bahamian islands, he recognized 132 endemic species of flowering plants.
There are only four countries in the WHO endemic list, including Pakistan, Nigeria and Afghanistan.
The Atlantic Forest stretches along Brazil's Atlantic coast, parts of Paraguay, Argentina, and Uruguay and boasts 20,000 plant species, 40 percent of which are endemic.