endemism


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en·dem·ic

 (ĕn-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Prevalent in a particular locality, region, or population: endemic diseases of the tropics.
2. Native only to a particular locality or region: endemic birds.
3. Common in or inherent to an enterprise or situation: "All the difficulties endemic to historical research become more acute in the case of war" (Constantine Pleshakov).
n.
1. An organism that is native only to a particular locality or region.
2. A disease that is prevalent in a particular locality, region, or population.

[From Greek endēmos, native, endemic : en-, in; see en-2 + dēmos, people; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

en·dem′i·cal·ly adv.
en·dem′ism n.

endemism

the quality of belonging to a particular race, region, or country. — endemicity, n.
See also: Race
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endemism - nativeness by virtue of originating or occurring naturally (as in a particular place)endemism - nativeness by virtue of originating or occurring naturally (as in a particular place)
nativeness - the quality of belonging to or being connected with a certain place or region by virtue of birth or origin
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Philippines is endowed with rich mineral deposits, it is also rich in biodiversity and very high endemism.
Sand-dwelling antlions in central Florida are non-invasive, nonendemic organisms that nevertheless thrive in the Florida scrub, a rare xeric ecosystem with a remarkably high rate of endemism (Deyrup 1990).
It includes territories of the western foothills of the Andes, with altitudes reaching up to 3,000 metres, which have generated a biodiversity with a high degree of endemism.
Most of the fauna and flora of the country shows very high endemism while sharing common features with neighbouring subcontinent.
The Philippines has been known as one of the 35 world's biodiversity hotspots or 'regions containing exceptional concentrations of plant endemism, but experiencing high rates of habitat loss.
Southeast Asia's tropical limestone region, which includes parts of southern China, is rich in biodiversity and high in endemism (Clements et al.
Geographical ranges of species and species endemism were calculated using the collection localities of the records.
Cantabrian endemism included in the IEAPCL, of which in Egido & al.
Our study shows there are double the number of areas of endemism than previously thought.