endgame

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end·game

also end game  (ĕnd′gām′)
n.
1. Games The final stage of a chess game after most of the pieces have been removed from the board.
2. The final stage of an extended process or course of events: the diplomatic endgame that led to the treaty.

endgame

(ˈɛndˌɡeɪm)
n
1. (Chess & Draughts) Also called: ending the closing stage of a game of chess, in which only a few pieces are left on the board
2. (Games, other than specified) the closing stage of any of certain other games
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endgame - the final stages of an extended process of negotiation; "the diplomatic endgame"
final stage, end, last - the concluding parts of an event or occurrence; "the end was exciting"; "I had to miss the last of the movie"
2.endgame - the final stages of a chess game after most of the pieces have been removed from the board
final stage, end, last - the concluding parts of an event or occurrence; "the end was exciting"; "I had to miss the last of the movie"
Translations
koncovka

endgame

end game, end-game [ˈɛndgeɪm] n
(CHESS)fin f de partie
(fig)fin f de partie

endgame

nEndspiel nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding Chess Endgames comes from a world-famous chess players who explains everything necessary to understand how chess endgames work.
Taking their (painterly) cues from such unfashionable and unlikely precedents as Edward Hopper, David Milne, Edvard Munch, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Doig's melancholic works--invariably landscapes--were anathema to the visceral theatrics and conceptual endgames of much '90s art.
Whereas chess experts would find themselves hard-pressed to answer such questions with any degree of certainty, a new, sophisticated computer program specifically designed for analyzing six-piece endgames can now provide the answers.
In A Voyage on the North Sea, Rosalind Krauss recalls that in the late '60s and early '70s artists including Richard Serra and Robert Smithson made a habit of visiting Anthology Film Archives, where they absorbed the canon of modernist film up to and including its structuralist endgames.
Kearney consultants, used this analysis to develop the Merger Endgames Theory, which states that all industries move through a distinct four-stage consolidation pattern spanning approximately 25 years.