curettage

(redirected from endometrial curettage)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to endometrial curettage: Endometrial polyp

cu·ret·tage

 (kyo͝or′ĭ-täzh′)
n.
The removal of tissue or growths from a body cavity, such as the uterus, by scraping with a curette. Also called curettement.

curettage

(ˌkjʊərɪˈtɑːʒ; kjʊəˈrɛtɪdʒ) or

curettement

n
(Surgery) the process of using a curette. See also D and C

cu•ret•tage

(ˌkyʊər ɪˈtɑʒ, kyʊˈrɛt ɪdʒ)

n.
the process of curetting. Compare D and C.
[1895–1900; < French]

curettage

A surgical method of scraping out a thin layer of tissue for analysis or disposal. See D C.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curettage - surgery to remove tissue or growths from a bodily cavity (as the uterus) by scraping with a curette
suction curettage, vacuum aspiration - a method of induced abortion; prior to the 14th week of gestation the embryo and placenta are removed by applying suction to the dilated cervix
D and C, dilatation and curettage, dilation and curettage - a surgical procedure usually performed under local anesthesia in which the cervix is dilated and the endometrial lining of the uterus is scraped with a curet; performed to obtain tissue samples or to stop prolonged bleeding or to remove small tumors or to remove fragments of placenta after childbirth or as a method of abortion
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
Translations
Abrasio uteriKürettage

curettage

[ˌkjʊəˈretɪdʒ] Nlegrado m, raspado m

curettage

n (Med) → Ausschabung f, → Kürettage f

cu·ret·tage

n. curetaje, raspado de una superficie o cavidad con uso de la cureta.

curettage

n curetaje m, legrado; suction — curetaje con succión
References in periodicals archive ?
Choriocarcinoma was a possible source of her elevated HCG but the negative endometrial curettage with decreasing HCG levels was reassuring.
I read with interest the article by Fadare et al (1) concerning the histology of radio-frequency endometrial ablation, especially after reviewing a recent endometrial curettage specimen in our institution from a woman with a prior hydrothermal ablation for menorrhagia.
Surgical procedures included hysterectomy (either total abdominal or total vaginal) in 6 patients, endometrial biopsies in 4 patients, and endometrial curettage in 1 patient.