endorphin


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en·dor·phin

 (ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
n.
Any of a group of peptide hormones that bind to opioid receptors and act as neurotransmitters. Endorphins reduce the sensation of pain and affect emotions.

[endo(genous) + (mo)rphin(e).]

endorphin

(ɛnˈdɔːfɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a class of polypeptides, including enkephalin, occurring naturally in the brain, that bind to pain receptors and so block pain sensation
[C20: from endo- + morphine]

en•dor•phin

(ɛnˈdɔr fɪn)

n.
any of a group of peptides, resembling opiates, that are released in the body in response to stress or trauma and that react with the brain's opiate receptors to reduce the sensation of pain.
[1970–75; end(ogenous) (m)orphine]

en·dor·phin

(ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
Any of a group of substances found in the nervous system, especially in the brain, that regulate the body's response to pain and other stimuli.
Did You Know? In the 1970s, scientists began to wonder why drugs like morphine could kill pain so effectively. Researchers knew that morphine attached to specific body molecules called receptors, so they reasoned that these receptors probably existed because the body itself had natural painkilling compounds that also bonded to those receptors. They searched and finally found proteins called endorphins, a word that combines endogenous, meaning "naturally occurring within the body," and morphine. When your body is under stress, it can produce endorphins so that you can still function under what would otherwise be exceptionally painful conditions. Many long-distance runners, for example, claim that after they run for a while they start to feel exceptionally happy, a condition sometimes called a runner's high. High levels of endorphins in response to the strain of running seem to be responsible for this state of mind.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endorphin - a neurochemical occurring naturally in the brain and having analgesic properties
peptide - amide combining the amino group of one amino acid with the carboxyl group of another; usually obtained by partial hydrolysis of protein
neurochemical - any organic substance that occurs in neural activity
beta endorphin - an endorphin produced by the pituitary gland that suppresses pain
enkephalin - an endorphin having opiate qualities that occurs in the brain and spinal cord and elsewhere
Translations

endorphin

[ˌenˈdɔːfɪn] Nendorfina f

endorphin

nEndorphin nt

endorphin

n endorfina
References in periodicals archive ?
With a mature and seamless pipeline used by large VFX and games studios around the world, endorphin lets you combine your existing animation assets with fully-simulated, award-winning motion synthesis.
It says that not only does tanning lead to browning of skin but also leads to the release of feel-good chemicals called endorphins which act like heroin and other opiates.
Prior studies had linked endorphins to pain relief.
Being in good spirits, keeping happy and optimistic also boosts our endorphin production.
This study suggests that p53, one of the best-known tumor-suppressor proteins in our body, goes into action when skin cells experience UV exposure, prompting the skin to tan as a defensive mechanism against DNA damage and at the same time creating endorphins that may alter sensation or even behavior.
Endorphin is a chemical that not only creates gives a mild high but also blocks out pain.
This, they said, was a measure of an increased endorphin release.
Regularly eating a balanced diet and getting a constant intake of carbohydrates will keep your serotonin and endorphin levels up, rather than getting them from sugary food.
Meditation, Yoga, Tai Chi and physical exercise are all ways of increasing our endorphin levels.
Music plus exercise gives you a "double whammy" of mood-enhancing hormones ( the exercise itself increases endorphin release, and so does music, which, study shows, helps avoid exercise pain and strain on the heart.
Low endorphin levels can be caused by certain vitamin and mineral deficiencies.