endoskeleton


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en·do·skel·e·ton

 (ĕn′dō-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
An internal supporting skeleton, derived from the mesoderm, that is characteristic of vertebrates and certain invertebrates.

en′do·skel′e·tal (-ĭ-tl) adj.

endoskeleton

(ˌɛndəʊˈskɛlɪtən)
n
(Zoology) the internal skeleton of an animal, esp the bony or cartilaginous skeleton of vertebrates. Compare exoskeleton
ˌendoˈskeletal adj

en•do•skel•e•ton

(ˌɛn doʊˈskɛl ɪ tn)

n.
the internal skeleton or framework of the body of an animal (opposed to exoskeleton).
[1830–40]
en`do•skel′e•tal, adj.

en·do·skel·e·ton

(ĕn′dō-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
A supporting framework in an animal that is contained inside the body. Humans and many other vertebrate animals have bony endoskeletons. Certain invertebrate animals, such as sponges, have endoskeletons made up of needle-like structures called spicules. Compare exoskeleton.

endoskeleton

- Contained entirely within the body of an animal, like that of mammals.
See also related terms for mammal.

endoskeleton

An internal skeleton, usually made of bone and cartilage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endoskeleton - the internal skeletonendoskeleton - the internal skeleton; bony and cartilaginous structure (especially of vertebrates)
craniate, vertebrate - animals having a bony or cartilaginous skeleton with a segmented spinal column and a large brain enclosed in a skull or cranium
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
clavicle, collarbone - bone linking the scapula and sternum
scapula, shoulder blade, shoulder bone - either of two flat triangular bones one on each side of the shoulder in human beings
skeletal system, systema skeletale, skeleton, frame - the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
appendicular skeleton - the part of the skeleton that includes the pectoral girdle and the pelvic girdle and the upper and lower limbs
axial skeleton - the part of the skeleton that includes the skull and spinal column and sternum and ribs
arm bone - a bone in the arm
leg bone - a bone of the leg
articulatio, joint, articulation - (anatomy) the point of connection between two bones or elements of a skeleton (especially if it allows motion)
Translations
EndoskelettInnenskelett
endosquelette

endoskeleton

[ˌɛndəʊˈskɛlɪtn] nendoscheletro
References in periodicals archive ?
Titan Spine LLC entered a distribution agreement with Spain-based MBA to provide Titan's line of Endoskeleton titanium implants to spine surgeons in six countries across Europe.
Terminator Arnold Schwarzenegger's catchphrase rang true when he took a selfie with this endoskeleton.
The numerical dimensional parameters of the endoskeleton design were optimised after a series of experiments and simulations (see Fig.
Paramount Pictures has just released a new picture of the endoskeleton of the cyborg that features in "Terminator: Genisys.
Because the skeletal plates (ossicles) that comprise echinoderm "hard parts" are precipitated as a mesodermal endoskeleton, there is potential for significant secondary modification throughout growth in response to stimuli (Raup 1966; Macurda & Meyer 1974).
Food and Drug Administration is gained by Titan Spine to commercially release its Endoskeleton TL system.
If all goes to plan, Google hopes to sell the modular Ara smartphone in 2015, starting at $50 for a bare-bones endoskeleton that you plug other modules into.
The case features protective padding and reinforced endoskeleton that absorbs impact, making the Air Protect the ideal case for Chromebook and laptop use in the classroom.
The design for Project Ara consists of what we call an endoskeleton (endo) and modules," Eremenko detailed, "The endo is the structural frame that holds all the modules in place.
The goal is to create a standard endoskeleton, or frame, that can hold different modules, like extra-powerful processors, additional batteries or memory chips for storing more music, all based on the customer's preferences.
Each participant tested four prosthetic feet: SACH, stationary attachment flexible endoskeleton (SAFE), Talux feet (conventional prosthetic feet), and Proprio foot (microprocessor-controlled foot).
As he moves on to descriptions of birds, there is even more emphasis on adaptive (and evolutionary) traits, how their shapes are "adapted to flying" and their legs "adapted for perching by the shape of the claws and the placing of the legs" He also notes that the class "examined the endoskeleton of Bird [sic] and compared it with the skeleton of the Fish, frog and snake" (56-57), presumably to explore similarities indicating an evolutionary path from fish through amphibians, reptiles, and birds.