endurance


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Related to endurance: Endurance training

en·dur·ance

 (ĕn-do͝or′əns, -dyo͝or′-)
n.
1. The act, quality, or power of withstanding hardship or stress: A marathon tests a runner's endurance.
2. The state or fact of persevering: Through hard work and endurance, we will complete this project.
3. Continuing existence; duration.

endurance

(ɪnˈdjʊərəns)
n
1. the capacity, state, or an instance of enduring
2. something endured; a hardship, strain, or privation

en•dur•ance

(ɛnˈdʊər əns, -ˈdyʊər-)

n.
1. the fact or power of bearing pain, hardship, or adversity.
2. the ability to continue or last; stamina.
3. lasting quality; duration.
[1485–95]

endurance

The time an aircraft can continue flying, or a ground vehicle or ship can continue operating, under specified conditions, e.g., without refueling. See also endurance distance.

Endurance

 

(See also PERSEVERANCE.)

bite the bullet To suffer pain without expressing fear; to grit one’s teeth and do what has to be done. This phrase derives from the supposed practice of giving a wounded soldier a bullet to bite on to channel his reaction to intense pain. This practice preceded the first use of anesthesia (in the U.S.) in 1844. By 1891, the phrase was used figuratively.

Bite on the bullet, old man, and don’t let them think you’re afraid. (Rudyard Kipling, The Light that Failed, 1891)

It is analogous to other phrases describing rituals such as take a deep breath and grit your teeth, which refer to preparing one-self or pulling one-self together in order to experience or do something unpleasant.

roll with the punches To endure with equanimity, not to be thrown by the blows of fate; to be resilient, bending slightly under pressure then bouncing back; to have the balanced perspective that comes of experiencing hardship. This common metaphor obviously owes its origin to pugilism.

stand the gaff To endure punishment, criticism, or ridicule; to sustain one-self through a period of stress or hardship; to keep one’s chin up. In this expression, gaff may refer to the steel spurs worn by fighting cocks, or it may derive from a Scottish term for noisy and abusive language.

Neil has got to stand the gaff for what he’s done. (W. M. Raine, B. O’Connor, 1910)

take it on the chin To face adversity courageously; to withstand punishment, to persevere against the odds; to bounce back from hardship with an undefeated attitude. This American slang expression originated in boxing.

I liked the Williams’ because of the way they took life on the chin. (D. Lytton, Goddam White Man, 1960)

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endurance - the power to withstand hardship or stressendurance - the power to withstand hardship or stress; "the marathon tests a runner's endurance"
strength - the property of being physically or mentally strong; "fatigue sapped his strength"
sufferance - patient endurance especially of pain or distress
stamina, staying power, toughness - enduring strength and energy
long-sufferance, long-suffering - patient endurance of pain or unhappiness
tolerance - the power or capacity of an organism to tolerate unfavorable environmental conditions
2.endurance - a state of survivingendurance - a state of surviving; remaining alive
aliveness, animation, living, life - the condition of living or the state of being alive; "while there's life there's hope"; "life depends on many chemical and physical processes"
subsistence - a means of surviving; "farming is a hard means of subsistence"

endurance

endurance

noun
1. The quality or power of withstanding hardship or stress:
2. Uninterrupted existence or succession:
Translations
إحْتِمال
udholdenhed
ending, òol, òrek
vytrvalostnýznesiteľnosť
vztrajnost

endurance

[ɪnˈdjʊərəns]
A. Nresistencia f
to come to the end of one's enduranceno poder más, llegar a sus límites
past or beyond enduranceinaguantable, insoportable
to be tried beyond enduranceser puesto a prueba
it tested his powers of endurancepuso a prueba su resistencia
B. CPD endurance race Ncarrera f de resistencia
endurance test Nprueba f de resistencia

endurance

[ɪnˈdjʊərəns]
n
(= stamina) → endurance f
(= patience) → patience f
modif (SPORT) [sport, race] → d'endurance; [record] → d'endurance; [athlete] → d'endurance; [training] → d'enduranceendurance test népreuve f d'endurance

endurance

nDurchhaltevermögen nt; to have great powers of endurancegroßes Durchhaltevermögen haben; what a feat of endurancewelche Ausdauer!; he was tried beyond enduranceer wurde über die Maßen gereizt; his suffering was beyond endurancesein Leiden war unerträglich

endurance

:
endurance race
n (Sport) Rennen, bei dem es vor allem auf die Ausdauer ankommt
endurance test
nBelastungsprobe f; (fig)Durchhaltetest m

endurance

[ɪnˈdjʊərns] nresistenza
to come to the end of one's endurance → arrivare al limite della propria sopportazione
past or beyond endurance → al di là di ogni sopportazione
tried beyond endurance → messo/a a dura prova

endure

(inˈdjuə) verb
1. to bear patiently; to tolerate. She endures her troubles bravely; I can endure her rudeness no longer.
2. to remain firm; to last. You must endure to the end; The memory of her great acting has endured.
enˈdurable adjective
(negative unendurable) able to be borne or tolerated. This pain is scarcely endurable.
enˈdurance noun
the power or ability to bear or to last. He has amazing (power of) endurance; Her rudeness is beyond endurance; (also adjective) endurance tests.

en·dur·ance

n. resistencia; tolerancia;
beyond ___más allá de lo que puede soportarse, intolerable.
References in classic literature ?
She was then fifty-five years old, a strong woman, of unusual endurance.
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
And whatever they may reveal of the divine love in the Son, the soft, curled, hermaphroditical Italian pictures, in which his idea has been most successfully embodied; these pictures, so destitute as they are of all brawniness, hint nothing of any power, but the mere negative, feminine one of submission and endurance, which on all hands it is conceded, form the peculiar practical virtues of his teachings.
By and by they would have their revenge, though, for the thing was getting beyond human endurance, and the people would rise and murder the packers.
Miss Ophelia had a good, strong, practical deal of resolution; and she went through all the disgusting details with heroic thoroughness, though, it must be confessed, with no very gracious air,--for endurance was the utmost to which her principles could bring her.
I, who cannot stay in my chamber for a single day without acquiring some rust, and when sometimes I have stolen forth for a walk at the eleventh hour, or four o'clock in the afternoon, too late to redeem the day, when the shades of night were already beginning to be mingled with the daylight, have felt as if I had committed some sin to be atoned for,--I confess that I am astonished at the power of endurance, to say nothing of the moral insensibility, of my neighbors who confine themselves to shops and offices the whole day for weeks and months, aye, and years almost together.
She was strong enough for the scout service, and had the endurance, too, but she couldn't quite come up to the speed required; a scout horse has to have steel in his muscle and lightning in his blood.
Such endurance is to be expected in savages and prize-fighters, for they are born and educated to it; but to find it in such perfection in these gently bred and kindly natured young fellows is matter for surprise.
He believed he had taxed the forbearance of the powers above to the extremity of endurance and that this was the result.
The punishment was bad enough, but to be coupled in correction with Seesaw Simpson was beyond human endurance.
To illustrate the effect of slavery on the white man,--to show that he has no powers of endurance, in such a condition, superior to those of his black brother,--DANIEL O'CONNELL, the distinguished advocate of universal emancipation, and the mighti- est champion of prostrate but not conquered Ireland, relates the following anecdote in a speech delivered by him in the Conciliation Hall, Dublin, before the Loyal National Repeal Association, March 31, 1845.
seemed to burst from an overcharged heart, and to describe somewhat of the continual endurance to be practised by her, even towards some of those who loved her best.