endure

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en·dure

 (ĕn-do͝or′, -dyo͝or′)
v. en·dured, en·dur·ing, en·dures
v.tr.
1. To carry on through, despite hardships; undergo or suffer: endure an Arctic winter.
2. To put up with; tolerate: I cannot endure your insolence any longer.
v.intr.
1. To continue in existence; last: buildings that have endured for centuries.
2. To suffer patiently without yielding.

[Middle English enduren, from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre, to make hard : in-, against, into; see en-1 + dūrus, hard; see deru- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: endure, bear1, stand, abide, suffer, tolerate
These verbs mean to put up with something, especially something difficult, annoying, or painful. Endure stresses forbearance in the face of ongoing difficulties: "Human life is everywhere a state in which much is to be endured and little to be enjoyed" (Samuel Johnson).
Bear can suggest a stalwart capacity to put up with something painful or unpleasant: "Those best can bear reproof who merit praise" (Alexander Pope).
Stand and the more formal abide often imply forbearance that comes from resolute self-control under provoking circumstances: He couldn't stand taking orders from anyone. She couldn't abide fools.
Suffer has a similar range but adds a suggestion of meekness or resignation: He suffered their insults in silence.
Tolerate, in this sense, generally connotes a reluctant or indulgent acceptance: "Young Konrad loved animals, and his parents tolerated the many household pets he acquired—birds, a dog, fish, a lemur" (Dale Peterson).

endure

(ɪnˈdjʊə)
vb
1. to undergo (hardship, strain, privation, etc) without yielding; bear
2. (tr) to permit or tolerate
3. (intr) to last or continue to exist
[C14: from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre to harden, from dūrus hard]
enˈdurable adj
enˌduraˈbility, enˈdurableness n
enˈdurably adv

en•dure

(ɛnˈdʊər, -ˈdyʊər)

v. -dured, -dur•ing. v.t.
1. to hold out against; undergo: to endure hardship.
2. to bear patiently or without resistance; tolerate.
3. to admit of; allow; bear.
v.i.
4. to continue to exist; last.
5. to support adverse force or influence; suffer without yielding.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French endurer < Latin indūrāre to harden, make lasting =in- in-2 + dūrāre to last, be or become hard, derivative of dūrus hard]
en•dur′er, n.
syn: See bear1. See also continue.

endure


Past participle: endured
Gerund: enduring

Imperative
endure
endure
Present
I endure
you endure
he/she/it endures
we endure
you endure
they endure
Preterite
I endured
you endured
he/she/it endured
we endured
you endured
they endured
Present Continuous
I am enduring
you are enduring
he/she/it is enduring
we are enduring
you are enduring
they are enduring
Present Perfect
I have endured
you have endured
he/she/it has endured
we have endured
you have endured
they have endured
Past Continuous
I was enduring
you were enduring
he/she/it was enduring
we were enduring
you were enduring
they were enduring
Past Perfect
I had endured
you had endured
he/she/it had endured
we had endured
you had endured
they had endured
Future
I will endure
you will endure
he/she/it will endure
we will endure
you will endure
they will endure
Future Perfect
I will have endured
you will have endured
he/she/it will have endured
we will have endured
you will have endured
they will have endured
Future Continuous
I will be enduring
you will be enduring
he/she/it will be enduring
we will be enduring
you will be enduring
they will be enduring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been enduring
you have been enduring
he/she/it has been enduring
we have been enduring
you have been enduring
they have been enduring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been enduring
you will have been enduring
he/she/it will have been enduring
we will have been enduring
you will have been enduring
they will have been enduring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been enduring
you had been enduring
he/she/it had been enduring
we had been enduring
you had been enduring
they had been enduring
Conditional
I would endure
you would endure
he/she/it would endure
we would endure
you would endure
they would endure
Past Conditional
I would have endured
you would have endured
he/she/it would have endured
we would have endured
you would have endured
they would have endured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.endure - put up with something or somebody unpleasantendure - put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
live with, swallow, accept - tolerate or accommodate oneself to; "I shall have to accept these unpleasant working conditions"; "I swallowed the insult"; "She has learned to live with her husband's little idiosyncrasies"
hold still for, stand for - tolerate or bear; "I won't stand for this kind of behavior!"
bear up - endure cheerfully; "She bore up under the enormous strain"
take lying down - suffer without protest; suffer or endure passively; "I won't take this insult lying down"
take a joke - listen to a joke at one's own expense; "Can't you take a joke?"
sit out - endure to the end
pay - bear (a cost or penalty), in recompense for some action; "You'll pay for this!"; "She had to pay the penalty for speaking out rashly"; "You'll pay for this opinion later"
countenance, permit, allow, let - consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam"
suffer - experience (emotional) pain; "Every time her husband gets drunk, she suffers"
2.endure - face and withstand with courageendure - face and withstand with courage; "She braved the elements"
defy, withstand, hold up, hold - resist or confront with resistance; "The politician defied public opinion"; "The new material withstands even the greatest wear and tear"; "The bridge held"
3.endure - continue to live through hardship or adversity; "We went without water and food for 3 days"; "These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America"; "The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents"; "how long can a person last without food and water?"
live, be - have life, be alive; "Our great leader is no more"; "My grandfather lived until the end of war"
subsist, exist, survive, live - support oneself; "he could barely exist on such a low wage"; "Can you live on $2000 a month in New York City?"; "Many people in the world have to subsist on $1 a day"
hold water, stand up, hold up - resist or withstand wear, criticism, etc.; "Her shoes won't hold up"; "This theory won't hold water"
perennate - survive from season to season, of plants
live out - live out one's life; live to the end
4.endure - undergo or be subjected to; "He suffered the penalty"; "Many saints suffered martyrdom"
tolerate - have a tolerance for a poison or strong drug or pathogen or environmental condition; "The patient does not tolerate the anti-inflammatory drugs we gave him"
die - suffer or face the pain of death; "Martyrs may die every day for their faith"
experience, go through, see - go or live through; "We had many trials to go through"; "he saw action in Viet Nam"
5.endure - last and be usable; "This dress wore well for almost ten years"
last, endure - persist for a specified period of time; "The bad weather lasted for three days"
6.endure - persist for a specified period of time; "The bad weather lasted for three days"
run for, run - extend or continue for a certain period of time; "The film runs 5 hours"
measure - have certain dimensions; "This table surfaces measures 20inches by 36 inches"
hold out, endure, wear - last and be usable; "This dress wore well for almost ten years"
drag on, drag out - last unnecessarily long
7.endure - continue to exist; "These stories die hard"; "The legend of Elvis endures"
continue - exist over a prolonged period of time; "The bad weather continued for two more weeks"
carry over - transfer or persist from one stage or sphere of activity to another
run - occur persistently; "Musical talent runs in the family"
reverberate - have a long or continuing effect; "The discussions with my teacher reverberated throughout my adult life"

endure

verb
1. experience, suffer, bear, weather, meet, go through, encounter, cope with, sustain, brave, undergo, withstand, live through, thole (Scot.) He'd endured years of pain and sleepless nights because of arthritis.
2. put up with, stand, suffer, bear, allow, accept, stick (slang), take (informal), permit, stomach, swallow, brook, tolerate, hack (slang), abide, submit to, countenance, stick out (informal), take patiently I simply can't endure another moment of her company.
3. last, live, continue, remain, stay, hold, stand, go on, survive, live on, prevail, persist, abide, be durable, wear well Somehow the language endures and continues to survive to this day.
Proverbs
"What can't be cured must be endured"

endure

verb
1. To carry on through despite hardships:
2. To put up with:
Informal: lump.
Idioms: take it, take it lying down.
3. To be in existence or in a certain state for an indefinitely long time:
4. To withstand stress or difficulty:
Translations
يَتَحَمَّل، يَحْتَمِليَصْبِر، يِبْقى ثابِتا
snášetvytrvat
fortsætteholde sigtåleudholde
endastòola
atsparumasišliktiišsilaikytiištvermėkantrumas
ilgtizturēt
pretrpeti

endure

[ɪnˈdjʊəʳ]
A. VT (= suffer) [+ pain, heat] → resistir, aguantar; (= tolerate) → aguantar, soportar
she can't endure being laughed atno soporta que se rían de ella
I can't endure being correctedno aguanto que me corrijan
to endure doing sthaguantar hacer algo
I can't endure himno lo puedo ver, no lo aguanto or soporto
I can't endure it a moment longerno lo aguanto un momento más
B. VI (= last) → durar; (= not give in) → aguantar, resistir

endure

[ɪnˈdjʊər]
vt (= bear) [+ pain, illness, hardship, suffering] → endurer; [+ abuse, torture, humiliation, criticism] → endurer
vi (= last) [relationship, marriage] → durer; [idea, attraction] → perdurer

endure

vt
(= undergo) pain, insults, losses, tribulations, hardshiperleiden
(= put up with)ertragen; agonyaushalten, ertragen; it was more than I could endureich konnte es nicht mehr ertragen; she can’t endure being laughed atsie kann es nicht vertragen or haben (inf), → wenn man über sie lacht
vibestehen; (work, memories also)Bestand haben

endure

[ɪnˈdjʊəʳ]
1. vtsopportare
I can't endure being teased → non sopporto di essere preso in giro
2. vi (friendship, memory, peace) → durare; (book, building) → resistere

endure

(inˈdjuə) verb
1. to bear patiently; to tolerate. She endures her troubles bravely; I can endure her rudeness no longer.
2. to remain firm; to last. You must endure to the end; The memory of her great acting has endured.
enˈdurable adjective
(negative unendurable) able to be borne or tolerated. This pain is scarcely endurable.
enˈdurance noun
the power or ability to bear or to last. He has amazing (power of) endurance; Her rudeness is beyond endurance; (also adjective) endurance tests.

endure

v. soportar, sobrellevar, resistir, aguantar.

endure

vt aguantar, tolerar
References in classic literature ?
In this one little was said of the hardships endured, the dangers faced, or the homesickness conquered.
It is a truth (and it would be a very sad one but for the higher hopes which it suggests) that no great mistake, whether acted or endured, in our mortal sphere, is ever really set right.
She deemed in her crime most to be repented of, that she had ever endured and reciprocated the lukewarm grasp of his hand, and had suffered the smile of her lips and eyes to mingle and melt into his own.
I've endured that child's impudence long enough; and now I'll bring her down,--I'll make her lie in the dust
But it was a private pet name only, and never spoken aloud to any one, much less to him; being a noble, he would not have endured a familiarity like that from me.
Presently I was deriving exquisite suffering from this employment, yet maybe I could have endured it if the mouse had attended steadily to his work; but he did not do that; he stopped every now and then, and I suffered more while waiting and listening for him to begin again than I did while he was gnawing.
He would cry for nothing; he would burst into storms of devilish temper without notice, and let go scream after scream and squall after squall, then climax the thing with "holding his breath"-- that frightful specialty of the teething nursling, in the throes of which the creature exhausts its lungs, then is convulsed with noiseless squirmings and twistings and kickings in the effort to get its breath, while the lips turn blue and the mouth stands wide and rigid, offering for inspection one wee tooth set in the lower rim of a hoop of red gums; and when the appalling stillness has endured until one is sure the lost breath will never return, a nurse comes flying, and dashes water in the child's face, and--presto
fortunate for a large circle of friends and acquaint- ances, whose sympathy and affection he has strongly secured by the many sufferings he has endured, by his virtuous traits of character, by his ever-abiding remembrance of those who are in bonds, as being bound with them
The bustle and joy of such an arrival, the many to be talked to, welcomed, encouraged, and variously dispersed and disposed of, produced a noise and confusion which his nerves could not have borne under any other cause, nor have endured much longer even for this; but the ways of Hartfield and the feelings of her father were so respected by Mrs.
What I endured in so beholding her--but I have no right to wound your feelings by attempting to describe it--I have pained you too much already.
Reed would have endured my presence more complacently; her children would have entertained for me more of the cordiality of fellow-feeling; the servants would have been less prone to make me the scapegoat of the nursery.
Sir,' I exclaimed, 'sitting here within these four walls, at one stretch, I have endured and forgiven the four hundred and ninety heads of your discourse.