enemy combatant


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enemy combatant

Any person in an armed conflict who could be properly detained under the laws and customs of war. Also called EC.
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is a resounding yes: The President might legitimately and lawfully judge Anwar al-Awlaki to be an enemy combatant, covered by the September 18, 2001 AUMF.
If the enemy combatant achieves a simultaneous mission kill against six of the small combatants, only two will remain to continue the mission.
Without a significant about face in leadership that is willing to discern the basic difference between an unlawful enemy combatant and a domestic criminal, America's reputation will remain under a cloud of suspicion and confusion regarding the legality of our actions associated with two significant areas of critique: rendition and targeted killing vis-a-vis unlawful enemy combatants in the War on Terror.
You are not an enemy combatant, you are a terrorist," the sentencing judge told Reid.
c) Determination of Unlawful Enemy Combatant Status Dispositive.
The Enemy Combatant Cases decided by the Supreme Court, Rasul v.
Given the substantial overlap between the definitions of "enemy combatant" and "POW," a CSRT's affirmative enemy combatant determination actually supports a detainee's POW status.
The act defines an enemy combatant as "a person who has engaged in hostilities or who has purposefully and materially supported hostilities against the United States" or anyone who "has been determined to be an unlawful enemy combatant" by a tribunal set up by the President or the Secretary of Defense.
The MWD would therefore seem to fit the latter definition describing a non-lethal weapon; for purposes of this review, a MWD is likened to using a non-lethal weapon system to apprehend an enemy combatant.
By their analysis, any drug dealer could be held as an enemy combatant as a part of the war on drugs.
A soldier aims across the battlefield at an enemy combatant.
THE DAY THE Supreme Court handed down what have collectively become known as the enemy combatant cases--June 28, 2004--was both widely anticipated and widely received as a legal moment of truth for the Bush administration's war on terrorism.