energy


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en·er·gy

 (ĕn′ər-jē)
n. pl. en·er·gies
1. The capacity for work or vigorous activity: Who has the energy to climb that trail? See Synonyms at strength.
2.
a. also energies Exertion of vigor or power: a project requiring a great deal of time and energy; devoted her energies to writing songs.
b. Vitality and intensity of expression: a speech delivered with energy and emotion.
c. Informal A nonphysical force or quality perceived as inhering in a particular place, person, or situation: was turned off by the group's negative energy.
3.
a. Usable heat or power: Each year Americans consume a high percentage of the world's energy.
b. A source of usable power, such as petroleum or coal.
4. Physics
a. The capacity of a physical system to do work.
b. A form, amount, or level of this capacity: "a searing beam of 30 trillion protons, with energies up to 50 million electronvolts" (Science News).

[French énergie, from Late Latin energīa, from Greek energeia, from energos, active : en-, in, at; see en-2 + ergon, work; see werg- in Indo-European roots.]

energy

(ˈɛnədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. intensity or vitality of action or expression; forcefulness
2. capacity or tendency for intense activity; vigour
3. vigorous or intense action; exertion
4. (General Physics) physics
a. the capacity of a body or system to do work
b. a measure of this capacity, expressed as the work that it does in changing to some specified reference state. It is measured in joules (SI units). Symbol: E
5. a source of power. See also kinetic energy, potential energy
[C16: from Late Latin energīa, from Greek energeia activity, from energos effective, from en-2 + ergon work]

en•er•gy

(ˈɛn ər dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. the capacity for vigorous activity; available power.
2. a feeling of having an adequate or abundant amount of such power.
3. Often energies. an exertion of such power; effort: threw her energies into the job.
4. the habit of vigorous activity; vigor.
5. the ability to act, lead others, or effect things forcefully.
6. forcefulness of expression.
7. Physics. the capacity to do work. Symbol: E
8. a source of usable power, as fossil fuel or electricity.
[1575–85; < Late Latin energīa < Greek enérgeia activity <energe- (s. of energeîn to be in action, operate =en- en-2 + -ergeîn, derivative of érgos work) + -ia -y3]

en·er·gy

(ĕn′ər-jē)
1. The capacity or power to do work, such as the capacity to move an object (of a given mass) in a given direction by the application of force. Energy can exist in a variety of forms, such as electrical, mechanical, chemical, thermal, or nuclear, and can be transformed from one form to another. It is measured by the amount of work done, usually in joules or watts. See more at law of conservation of energy. Compare power, work.
2. Usable heat or power: The school consumed too much energy last year.

Energy

 

See Also: ACTIVENESS, BUSYNESS, ENTHUSIASM

  1. Adrenaline bubbling in my veins like grease in a deep fryer —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  2. Adrenaline flooded through me like water through a storm drain —Sue Grafton
  3. Adrenaline flowing like electricity —W. P. Kinsella
  4. Alger-like energy —Hortense Calisher
  5. As brisk as a bee in a tar-pot —Thomas Fuller

    The condensed version of this, “Brisk as a bee,” can be traced back to Boswell’s Life of Dr. Johnson, where it was used to describe someone’s conversational style. A variation (also from Fuller’s collection of aphorisms) is, “As brisk as a body louse.”

  6. Bracing as an Alpine breeze —Israel Zangwill
  7. (Suddenly this spring he’s) bursting with energy, like the daffodils on the White House lawn —James Reston about Ronald Reagan, New York Times, March 30, 1986
  8. Electricity dripping from me like cream —Diane Wakoski
  9. Energetic and tireless … like a shouting insect, some kind of queen aunt —J. B. Priestly
  10. Energetic … an explosion of vitality, rather like a teapot set not to boil over but to bubble and steam —Charles Johnson
  11. (Feeling as) energetic as a licensed jester —Clarence Major
  12. Energy burned off him like a light —Pat Conroy
  13. (Quick, incisive) energy like quicksilver in the veins —Joan Chase
  14. Energy … like the biblical grain of mustard-seed, will remove mountains —Hosea Ballou
  15. Energy sings like a tea kettle —Marge Piercy
  16. Energy … thin and sharp like gravy —Diane Wakoski
  17. Full of pep as an electric fan —Anon
  18. (Little Billie was full of piss and vinegar and) full of sap as a maple tree —Robert Penn Warren

    In Warren’s long poem, The Ballad of Billie Potts, the maple tree comparison is followed by another simile: “And full of tricks as a lop-eared pup.”

  19. Full of vitality … like a lighted candle —Rachel Ingalls
  20. Had a brisk air of bristle, like a terrier bitch —Angela Carter
  21. He’s like 220 pounds worth of Duracell batteries —Mike Jameson, commenting on the untiring energy of boxer Mike Tyson, quoted in Newsday column by Paul Ballot, December 27, 1986
  22. Hum with unspent power, like a machine left to run —Mary Gordon
  23. (He is) just like a blob of mercury —Alice James writing from Europe about her brother William to her father and her brother Henry in America, 1889
  24. Like an old volcano, which has pretty nearly used up its fire and brimstone, but is still boiling and bubbling —Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
  25. Like the grass and trees and other growing things, they were quivering and glistening with vitality —Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  26. Refreshing, like rain at the end of a muggy day —Jay Mclnerney
  27. Rings with vitality, like ax-strokes on oak —Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  28. Sparks and twinkles like a jarred lightning bug —Sharon Sheehe Stark

    The comparison refers to a lively four-year-old girl in a story entitled The Johnstown Polka.

  29. Vigorous as a run-over cat —Marge Piercy
  30. Vitality … like a hot flame that burnt him with an unendurable fury —W. Somerset Maugham
  31. (She had a) vitality that warmed you like a blazing fire —W. Somerset Maugham
  32. Warm with life as the waters of a tropic sea —Beryl Markham

energy

The capacity for doing work.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.energy - (physics) a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the capacity of a physical system to do workenergy - (physics) a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the capacity of a physical system to do work; the units of energy are joules or ergs; "energy can take a wide variety of forms"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
activation energy, energy of activation - the energy that an atomic system must acquire before a process (such as an emission or reaction) can occur; "catalysts are said to reduce the energy of activation during the transition phase of a reaction"
alternative energy - energy derived from sources that do not use up natural resources or harm the environment
atomic energy, nuclear energy - the energy released by a nuclear reaction
binding energy, separation energy - the energy required to separate particles from a molecule or atom or nucleus; equals the mass defect
chemical energy - that part of the energy in a substance that can be released by a chemical reaction
electrical energy, electricity - energy made available by the flow of electric charge through a conductor; "they built a car that runs on electricity"
energy level, energy state - a definite stable energy that a physical system can have; used especially of the state of electrons in atoms or molecules; "according to quantum theory only certain energy levels are possible"
rest energy - the energy equivalent to the mass of a particle at rest in an inertial frame of reference; equal to the rest mass times the square of the speed of light
work - (physics) a manifestation of energy; the transfer of energy from one physical system to another expressed as the product of a force and the distance through which it moves a body in the direction of that force; "work equals force times distance"
heat, heat energy - a form of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature
mechanical energy - energy in a mechanical form
radiant energy - energy that is transmitted in the form of (electromagnetic) radiation; energy that exists in the absence of matter
radiation - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particles
2.energy - forceful exertionenergy - forceful exertion; "he plays tennis with great energy"; "he's full of zip"
forcefulness, strength, force - physical energy or intensity; "he hit with all the force he could muster"; "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"; "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"
athleticism, strenuosity - intense energy; "his music is characterized by a happy athleticism"
3.energy - enterprising or ambitious drive; "Europeans often laugh at American energy"
drive - the trait of being highly motivated; "his drive and energy exhausted his co-workers"
second wind - renewed energy or strength to continue an undertaking; "She had dinner and got a second wind to finish painting"; "the employers, initially taken by surprise at the pace of developments, regained their second wind"
4.energy - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing)energy - an imaginative lively style (especially style of writing); "his writing conveys great energy"; "a remarkable muscularity of style"
sprightliness, liveliness, spirit, life - animation and energy in action or expression; "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it"
verve, vitality - an energetic style
5.energy - a healthy capacity for vigorous activityenergy - a healthy capacity for vigorous activity; "jogging works off my excess energy"; "he seemed full of vim and vigor"
good health, healthiness - the state of being vigorous and free from bodily or mental disease
juice - energetic vitality; "her creative juices were flowing"
chi, ch'i, ki, qi - the circulating life energy that in Chinese philosophy is thought to be inherent in all things; in traditional Chinese medicine the balance of negative and positive forms in the body is believed to be essential for good health
6.energy - any source of usable power; "the DOE is responsible for maintaining the energy policy"
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
7.Energy - the federal department responsible for maintaining a national energy policy of the United States; created in 1977
executive department - a federal department in the executive branch of the government of the United States
Department of Energy Intelligence, DOEI - an agency that collects political and economic and technical information about energy matters and makes the Department of Energy's technical and analytical expertise available to other members of the Intelligence Community

energy

noun
1. strength, might, force, power, activity, intensity, stamina, exertion, forcefulness He was saving his energy for the big race in Belgium.
2. liveliness, life, drive, fire, spirit, determination, pep, go (informal), zip (informal), vitality, animation, vigour, verve, zest, resilience, welly (slang), get-up-and-go (informal), élan, brio, vivacity, vim (slang) At 65 years old, her energy and looks are wonderful.
3. power Oil shortages have brought an energy crisis.

energy

noun
Capacity or power for work or vigorous activity:
Translations
طَاقَةطاقَهقُوَّةنَشاط، حَيَوِيَّه
енергия
energie
energikræfterkraft=-energi
energia
energija
tenaga
herîa upp hugannorkaorka, kraftur
エネルギー元気
에너지
energijaenergingaienergingas
enerģija
energie
energijaenergíja
energi
พลังงาน
năng lượng

energy

[ˈenədʒɪ]
A. N (gen) → energía f; (= strength) → vigor m
electrical/atomic/solar energyenergía f eléctrica/atómica/solar
Secretary (of State) for EnergySecretario/a m/f (de Estado) de Energía
Minister of EnergyMinistro/a m/f de Energía
B. CPD energy conservation Nconservación f de la energía
energy crisis Ncrisis f inv energética
energy food Ncomida f energética or que da energías
energy level Nnivel m energético
energy needs NPLnecesidades fpl energéticas
energy policy Npolítica f de energía
energy resources NPLrecursos mpl energéticos
energy saving Nahorro m de energía

energy

[ˈɛnərdʒi]
n
(= strength, stamina) [person] → énergie f
(= power, fuel) → énergie f
Department of Energy → ministère m de l'Énergie
energies npl (= time and effort) → énergie f
to concentrate one's energies on sth → consacrer son énergie à qch
to put one's energies into sth → consacrer son énergie à qchenergy bar n (= food) → barre f énergétiqueenergy company ngroupe m énergétiqueenergy conservation néconomies fpl d'énergieenergy consumption nconsommation f d'énergieenergy crisis ncrise f de l'énergieenergy drink nboisson f énergétiqueenergy efficiency nefficacité f énergétiqueenergy-efficient energy efficient [ˌɛnərdʒiɪˈfɪʃənt] adj [battery, bulb] → économe en énergie; [building] → économe en énergieenergy level n [person] to have low energy levels → manquer d'énergie
to have a very high energy level → être plein(e) d'énergieenergy saving néconomies fpl d'énergieenergy-saving [ˈɛnərdʒiseɪvɪŋ] adj
[policy] → d'économie d'énergie
[device] → économique

energy

nEnergie f; he put his speech over with a lot of energyer hielt seine Rede mit viel Schwung; chocolate gives you energySchokolade gibt neue Energie; to concentrate one’s energies on doing somethingseine ganze Kraft dafür aufbieten, etw zu tun; to devote all one’s energies to somethingseine ganze Energie or Kraft für etw einsetzen; I haven’t the energymir fehlt die Energie dazu; to conserve one’s energiesmit seinen Kräften haushalten or Haus halten or sparsam umgehen; to save one’s energy for somethingseine Kräfte für etw aufsparen

energy

:
energy balance
n (of body)Energiehaushalt m
energy conservation
energy crisis
nEnergiekrise f
energy efficiency
nEnergieeffizienz f
energy-efficient
adjenergieeffizient
energy-giving
adj foodEnergie spendend
energy-intensive
adjenergieintensiv
energy-saving
adjEnergie sparend; energy featureEnergiesparfunktion f; energy measuresEnergiesparmaßnahmen pl
energy supplies
plEnergievorräte pl

energy

[ˈɛnədʒɪ] nenergia
I haven't the energy → non ho la forza
to put all one's energy into sth → dedicare tutte le proprie energie or forze a qc
Department of Energy → ministero dell'Industria (del Commercio e dell'Artigianato)

energy

(ˈenədʒi) plural ˈenergies noun
1. the ability to act, or the habit of acting, strongly and vigorously. He has amazing energy for his age; That child has too much energy; I must devote my energies to gardening today.
2. the power, eg of electricity, of doing work. electrical energy; nuclear energy.
ˌenerˈgetic (-ˈdʒetik) adjective
1. vigorous; very active. an energetic child.
2. requiring energy. an energetic walk.
ˌenerˈgetically adverb

energy

طَاقَة, قُوَّة energie energi Energie ενέργεια energía energia énergie energija energia エネルギー, 元気 에너지 energie energi energia energia силы, энергия energi พลังงาน enerji năng lượng 精力, 能量

en·er·gy

n. energía, la capacidad de trabajar, de moverse y hacer ejercicio con vigor;
chemical ______ química;
___ of activation___ de activación;
free ______ libre;
fusion ______ de fusión;
internal ______ interna;
kinetic ______ cinética;
latent ______ latente;
nuclear ______ nuclear;
nutritional ______ nutritiva;
potential ______ potencial;
psychic ______ síquica;
solar ______ solar;
total ______ total.

energy

n energía
References in classic literature ?
Believing that they could not begin too early to cultivate energy, industry, and independence, their parents consented, and both fell to work with the hearty good will which in spite of all obstacles is sure to succeed at last.
While he worked night and day to make his farms more productive and to extend his holdings of land, he regretted that he could not use his own restless energy in the building of temples, the slaying of unbelievers and in general in the work of glorifying God's name on earth.
The conditions in the Copan valley are likely to be still more difficult to overcome, and I feel that I risk failure without your young energy and your inventive mind to aid in the work and to suggest possible means of attaining our object.
Every inch of her was charged with an energy that made itself felt the moment she entered a room.
She rearranged her hair, combing and brushing it with unusual energy.
But, beyond this, the enterprise and energy of a people who have done so much in other places have done little here.
She strikes me as able, full of energy, and yet womanly.
Colonel Pyncheon, the claimant, as we gather from whatever traits of him are preserved, was characterized by an iron energy of purpose.
Oftentimes they were asleep, but occasionally might be heard talking together, ill voices between a speech and a snore, and with that lack of energy that distinguishes the occupants of alms-houses, and all other human beings who depend for subsistence on charity, on monopolized labour, or anything else but their own independent exertions.
He had lighted with such energy upon a thwart of his boat that his ivory leg had received a half-splintering shock.
Instead he had come to America, where he lived in a garret room in this slum district, and made volcanic energy take the place of fire.
There were energy and enterprise in the highest degree, but not efficiency or organization.