enervated


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Related to enervated: prelapsarian, thesaurus, innervated

en·er·vate

 (ĕn′ər-vāt′)
tr.v. en·er·vat·ed, en·er·vat·ing, en·er·vates
1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: "the luxury which enervates and destroys nations" (Henry David Thoreau).
2. Medicine To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr′vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

[Latin ēnervāre, ēnervāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + nervus, sinew; see (s)neəu- in Indo-European roots.]

en′er·va′tion n.
en′er·va′tive adj.
en′er·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Sometimes people mistakenly use enervate to mean "to invigorate" or "to excite" by assuming that this word is a close cousin of the verb energize. In fact enervate does not come from the same source as energize (Greek energos, "active"). It comes from Latin nervus, "sinew." Thus enervate means "to cause to become 'out of muscle' ," that is, "to weaken or deplete of strength."

enervated

(ˈɛnəveɪtɪd)
adj
literary having been deprived of strength or vitality
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.enervated - lacking strength or vigorenervated - lacking strength or vigor    
weak - wanting in physical strength; "a weak pillar"

enervated

adjective weakened, spent, done in (informal), weak, tired, drained, undermined, exhausted, fatigued, run-down, limp, feeble, sapped, worn out, debilitated, unnerved, washed out, incapacitated, enfeebled, devitalized Warm winds make many people feel enervated and depressed.
Translations

enervated

[ˈɛnərveɪtɪd] adj (= weak) → affaibli(e)
References in classic literature ?
Marie, whose nervous system had been enervated by a constant course of self-indulgence, had nothing to support the terror of the shock, and, at the time her husband breathed his last, was passing from one fainting fit to another; and he to whom she had been joined in the mysterious tie of marriage passed from her forever, without the possibility of even a parting word.
We made these strangers our bosom friends, our confidential servants; we borrowed their artists and their arts, and despised the honest simplicity and hardihood with which our brave ancestors supported themselves, and we became enervated by Norman arts long ere we fell under Norman arms.
Enervated, prostrate, and breathless, he became unconscious of outward objects; he seemed to be entering that vague delirium preceding death.
I was young; I had good health; pleasure and I had never met; no indulgence of hers had enervated or sated one faculty of my nature.
What such a temperature meant to us, enervated as we were by hardship, want of food, and the great heat of the desert, the reader may imagine better than I can describe.
Liza was as soft and enervated as Sappho was smart and abrupt.
They became exhausted in imitation of them; and they yaw-yawed in their speech like them; and they served out, with an enervated air, the little mouldy rations of political economy, on which they regaled their disciples.
There were occasions, however, when Mr Boffin, seeking a brief refuge from the blandishments of fashion, would present himself at the Bower after dark, to anticipate the next sallying forth of Wegg, and would there, on the old settle, pursue the downward fortunes of those enervated and corrupted masters of the world who were by this time on their last legs.
This flattened, seemingly frozen day also expresses the enervated world of war-weary soldiers.
Paul and Christianity, leading to a form of struggle that, unlike the Homeric agon, disabled, enervated, and debilitated those who participated in it.
Excuse me if I appear unusually ebullient, exultant, enervated and probably several other things beginning with 'e' today, but I have just seen the inspiring new documentary film 'Hawking' on the life of the world's best-known physicist.
The andante's opening was so enervated that it barely trudged, music as bleak as anything in the icy wastes of Winterreise.