enervating


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en·er·vate

 (ĕn′ər-vāt′)
tr.v. en·er·vat·ed, en·er·vat·ing, en·er·vates
1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: "the luxury which enervates and destroys nations" (Henry David Thoreau).
2. Medicine To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr′vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

[Latin ēnervāre, ēnervāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + nervus, sinew; see (s)neəu- in Indo-European roots.]

en′er·va′tion n.
en′er·va′tive adj.
en′er·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Sometimes people mistakenly use enervate to mean "to invigorate" or "to excite" by assuming that this word is a close cousin of the verb energize. In fact enervate does not come from the same source as energize (Greek energos, "active"). It comes from Latin nervus, "sinew." Thus enervate means "to cause to become 'out of muscle' ," that is, "to weaken or deplete of strength."

enervating

(ˈɛnəˌveɪtɪŋ)
adj
tending to deprive of strength or vitality; physically or mentally weakening; debilitating
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.enervating - causing debilitation
debilitating - impairing the strength and vitality

enervating

adjective weakening, tiring, draining, exhausting, debilitating an appalling and enervating disease
Translations

enervating

[ˈenɜːveɪtɪŋ] ADJenervador

enervating

[ˈɛnərveɪtɪŋ] adj (= weakening) → débilitant(e), affaiblissant(e)enfant terrible [ˌɒnfɒntɛˈriːblə] nenfant mf terrible

enervating

enervating

[ˈɛnəˌveɪtɪŋ] adjsnervante
References in classic literature ?
If he possesses an unusual share of native energy, or the enervating magic of place do not operate too long upon him, his forfeited powers may be redeemable.
The atmosphere was unnaturally warm, and the old year was dying feebly in sapping rain and enervating mist.
With very few exceptions, all the so-called Socialist and Communist publications that now (1847) circulate in Germany belong to the domain of this foul and enervating literature.
The contempt which the world pours out on poverty was death to Athanase; the enervating heat of solitude, without a breath or current of air, relaxed the bow which ever strove to tighten itself; his soul grew weary in this painful effort without results.
Morrel hesitated to advance; he dreaded the enervating effect of all that he saw.
Those beeches and smooth limes--there was something enervating in the very sight of them; but the strong knotted old oaks had no bending languor in them--the sight of them would give a man some energy.
The air of the place, so fresh in the spring and early summer, was stagnant and enervating now.
She had not yielded for an instant to the enervating charm of the tropics, but contrariwise was more active, more worldly, more decided than anyone in a temperate clime would have thought it possible to be.
That the fine things of life--art, music and literature--had thriven upon such enervating ideals he strenuously denied, insisting, rather, that they had endured in spite of civilization.
Sometimes it came upon him softly, in enervating reveries.
Little by little she felt the enervating influences let loose on her, in her lonely position, by her new train of thought.
If it had not been for the tempest of misfortunes that very soon burst over my head, all good impulses must have perished, and evil would have triumphed in the struggle that went on within me; enervating self-indulgence would have destroyed the body, as the detestable habits of egotism exhausted the springs of the soul.