enervating

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en·er·vate

 (ĕn′ər-vāt′)
tr.v. en·er·vat·ed, en·er·vat·ing, en·er·vates
1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: "the luxury which enervates and destroys nations" (Henry David Thoreau).
2. Medicine To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
adj. (ĭ-nûr′vĭt)
Deprived of strength; debilitated.

[Latin ēnervāre, ēnervāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + nervus, sinew; see (s)neəu- in Indo-European roots.]

en′er·va′tion n.
en′er·va′tive adj.
en′er·va′tor n.
Usage Note: Sometimes people mistakenly use enervate to mean "to invigorate" or "to excite" by assuming that this word is a close cousin of the verb energize. In fact enervate does not come from the same source as energize (Greek energos, "active"). It comes from Latin nervus, "sinew." Thus enervate means "to cause to become 'out of muscle' ," that is, "to weaken or deplete of strength."

enervating

(ˈɛnəˌveɪtɪŋ)
adj
tending to deprive of strength or vitality; physically or mentally weakening; debilitating
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.enervating - causing debilitation
debilitating - impairing the strength and vitality

enervating

adjective weakening, tiring, draining, exhausting, debilitating an appalling and enervating disease
Translations

enervating

[ˈenɜːveɪtɪŋ] ADJenervador

enervating

[ˈɛnərveɪtɪŋ] adj (= weakening) → débilitant(e), affaiblissant(e)enfant terrible [ˌɒnfɒntɛˈriːblə] nenfant mf terrible

enervating

enervating

[ˈɛnəˌveɪtɪŋ] adjsnervante
References in periodicals archive ?
As mention of the English Augustan age intimates, "classical" does not necessarily mean great, but may sometimes be used as a slur to dismiss a disciplined, perhaps enervatingly methodical, commitment to rational statement and precise versification as standards of excellence.
Devoted to Parisian memories made with his beloved partner, Maureen (who died in 2001), the last sections--slightly enlivened by descriptions of the nearly disastrous 2002 French election that might have put the National Front in power--are somewhat enervatingly steeped in the sadness and nostalgia of material better left to poems able to track that particular story rather than trying to fit into this multi-genre evocation of Paris.
Morris Dickstein found in Hyperion a vital political subtext in its "goal of ultimate social renovation by way of the disinterested exertions of art" (KP, 181); William Keach established the radical political implications of Keats's cockney couplets; David Bromwich reminded us that Keats's reviewers found his early poetry "at once enervatingly luxurious and transparently political" and that Keats's letters reveal an abiding concern with political issues (KP, 199); Paul Fry showed us in "To Autumn" not an escape from political conflict, but a timely "refusal to sublimate mortality as a social conspiracy" (KP, 219); and Alan Bewell argued that the poetry embodied a political identification with "the suffering and silence of political outsiders" (KP, 229).