enflesh

(redirected from enfleshment)

enflesh

(ɪnˈflɛʃ)
vb (tr)
1. to grow flesh or give a flesh-like form to
2. to ingrain
References in periodicals archive ?
And so it was through bones and gaps and spaces, through the enfleshment of my informed imagination, that I finally felt the whisper of her presence.
The movement of God is toward deeper and deeper incarnation, enfleshment.
At this time of year, when the church celebrates God's enfleshment in the person of Jesus Christ, this message is especially obvious.
This kenosis-incarnation is also theosis; the enfleshment of God is the divinization of the human.
This requires a "Christian animism" (4), theologically moored in "the incarnational enfleshment of God in Jesus, and the biblical promise of the Spirit to indwell everything that exists, [as] the paradigmatic expression[s] of God's presence in all things throughout the created order" (6).
Apostolicity propels the church outward, helping it to see that at its core, its esse, the church is to be the enfleshment, the embodiment of God's love in the world.
Schooling the postmodern body: Critical pedagogy and the politics of enfleshment.
He scorned, for example, the Platonic disregard for the body, making clear that our incarnate condition (like God's own enfleshment in human form) is not our shame but our splendor.
Having laid out this provocative and interesting thesis in the Introduction and first two chapters, O'Connell turns in chapter three to examine the dramatic representation of the body of Christ and its relation to the incarnation, "the enfleshment of God in Christ" (71), a theological idea that manifested itself, for example, in mendicant orders where spiritual practices were formulated to identify with and enact the humanity of Christ.
Peter Galadza, Kule Family Professor of Eastern Christian Liturgy at St Paul's, concurs: "I would insist that anyone chosen to stand before a community to give voice to its faith in melody is bound to be an enfleshment of its fundamental convictions" (p.
And I am grateful again for a practice that has joined Catholics throughout the world three times a day to reflect on God's enfleshment in our brother Jesus and on the role of the Jewish servant girl, Mary of Nazareth, who is the model of biblical faith.
In Percy's imagination, charity finds such a deep expression in sex that Sykes observes, "Sex serves as the analogue or type of divine enfleshment in Eucharistic and Incarnation" (144).