enframe


Also found in: Legal.

enframe

(ɪnˈfreɪm)
vb (tr)
to put inside a frame
References in periodicals archive ?
This new global ruling class, dubbed the corporatocracy by John Perkins (Perkins, 2006, xv), geographically mobile and immensely wealthy, along with the people they have co-opted to serve their interests, is ultimately responsible for maintaining the trajectory of modernity towards global ecological destruction, are not only not going to be challenged by people espousing the notion of sustainable development, but have actively promoted it to enframe debates on the environment.
To this day, the nervous oscillation between crowds and peoplehood intrinsic to this form of government has inflected the republic's institutions and constructs, which are haunted and imbued from within by the crowds they otherwise set out to mold, enframe, and address.
Thus, for Nancy (2000), ecotechnologies enframe the world and imply a triple division of the world: 'the division of the rich from the poor; the division of the integrated from the excluded; and the division of North from the South' (p.
When he writes of the machinic (deliberately, digitally crude), wildly popular game Minecraft, one can hear Kinsella's resistance to the lyric presence immersed in the natural world: "Minecraft's overt image of nature as calculation might lead us to question the everyday notion of a pure, untouched nature, and to confront the extent to which that notion masks the operations that enframe nature, with devastating environmental effects, as resource and data.
Even prior to reaching the courts, interactions between claimants and experts serve to enframe how Indigenous sovereignty is defined, how it is narrated, and what it means.
Although the particular nuances in criteria shift from state to state, or country to country, the following questions enframe the application process for acceptance as a 'best practice': Is the research transparent?
When a comment works itself around another, to enframe, it is claiming that it supersedes the original?
As such it promised ways of taking conceptions of human subjectivity beyond the materialist-immaterialist dichotomy that enframed debate in the seventeenth century and that has continued to enframe it for much of the period since.
This is because changing conditions over time alter the contexts that socially enframe meanings and values.
Such maps helped enframe the territory of BC within a European culture of vision, measurement and administration, thereby introducing 'a geographical imaginary that ignored indigenous ways of knowing and recording space, ways that settlers could not imagine and did not need as soon as their maps reoriented them after their own fashion' (Harris 2004, 175).
Reserving this chapter and these opening murders to display the emergence of the Klan, Dixon uses microscopy to enframe the violence we anticipate in the pages that follow.
39) More generally, though, I am troubled by Griffin's theatrical metaphor, strikingly reminiscent as it is of Bloch's, which, in reducing the physical environment to a stage setting, a frame, also tends to enframe it, placing it at the disposal of human agents, whose interactions are constituted as the only show in town.