enframe


Also found in: Legal.

enframe

(ɪnˈfreɪm)
vb (tr)
to put inside a frame
References in periodicals archive ?
Even prior to reaching the courts, interactions between claimants and experts serve to enframe how Indigenous sovereignty is defined, how it is narrated, and what it means.
As such it promised ways of taking conceptions of human subjectivity beyond the materialist-immaterialist dichotomy that enframed debate in the seventeenth century and that has continued to enframe it for much of the period since.
This is because changing conditions over time alter the contexts that socially enframe meanings and values.
Reserving this chapter and these opening murders to display the emergence of the Klan, Dixon uses microscopy to enframe the violence we anticipate in the pages that follow.
The latter however did not arrive with absolute powers to translate and historically enframe diverse artistic expressions; realism as inscription was frequently decorative, devoid of a rational, metalinguistic status accorded to it by a Hegelian aesthetics of the west.
39) More generally, though, I am troubled by Griffin's theatrical metaphor, strikingly reminiscent as it is of Bloch's, which, in reducing the physical environment to a stage setting, a frame, also tends to enframe it, placing it at the disposal of human agents, whose interactions are constituted as the only show in town.
She attempts to enframe the situation of the feminine once and for all in a world in which women, struggling with all their might against the daily violence of a masculine world, become like the very enemy they seek to leave behind.
In Heideggerian language (see note 18, above), the conflict concerns what will enframe medicine: will medicine be called forth as relief of pain or as technoluxe?
The reason, I believe, is that "book one" is largely based on studies that have focused on a conception of landscape that grew out of the English elite's desire to enclose and enframe the landscape as a frozen, pictorialized, and fundamentally illusory scenic object, to be contemplated and possessed as private property.
If the Wades of Africa want to enframe Africa's developmental agenda with an African detailed action plan, we should cheer them.
89) Our relationships of love have already been transforming our feelings as intentional responses and thus bringing about all sorts of affective and cognitive effects in us through the examples, images, symbols, stories, and beliefs that spell out for us in a performative fashion the meanings and values that enframe our moral deliberations.
Alterations in the relationship between patient and physician over the last fifty years have occurred within a set of large transformations in the medical and social parameters that enframe the relationship.