enfranchisement


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en·fran·chise

 (ĕn-frăn′chīz′)
tr.v. en·fran·chised, en·fran·chis·ing, en·fran·chis·es
1. To endow with the rights of citizenship, especially the right to vote.
2. To free, as from bondage.
3. To bestow a franchise on.

[Middle English enfraunchisen, from Old French enfranchir, enfranchiss-, to set free : en-, intensive pref.; see en-1 + franchir (from franc, free; see frank1).]

en·fran′chise′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enfranchisement - freedom from political subjugation or servitude
freedom - the condition of being free; the power to act or speak or think without externally imposed restraints
2.enfranchisement - a statutory right or privilege granted to a person or group by a government (especially the rights of citizenship and the right to vote)
legal right - a right based in law
right to vote, suffrage, vote - a legal right guaranteed by the 15th amendment to the US Constitution; guaranteed to women by the 19th amendment; "American women got the vote in 1920"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.enfranchisement - the act of certifying or bestowing a franchise on
empowerment, authorisation, authorization - the act of conferring legality or sanction or formal warrant
accreditation - the act of granting credit or recognition (especially with respect to educational institution that maintains suitable standards); "a commission is responsible for the accreditation of medical schools"
disenfranchisement - the act of withdrawing certification or terminating a franchise

enfranchisement

noun giving the vote, giving voting rights, granting voting rights, granting suffrage or the franchise Sylvia Pankhurst, who fought for women's enfranchisement
Translations

enfranchisement

[ɪnˈfræntʃɪzmənt] Nemancipación f (of de) (Pol) → concesión f del derecho de votar (of a)

enfranchisement

[ɪnˈfræntʃɪzmənt] n
(= granting of the right to vote) → octroi m de droit de vote
(= freedom) → affranchissement m

enfranchisement

n
(Pol) → Erteilung fdes Wahlrechts; after the enfranchisement of womennachdem die Frauen das Wahlrecht erhalten hatten
(of slave)Freilassung f

enfranchisement

[ɪnˈfræntʃɪzmənt] n (frm) (see vb) enfranchisement (of)concessione f del diritto di voto a, affrancamento (di)
References in classic literature ?
Clare, the day after he had commenced the legal formalities for his enfranchisement, "I'm going to make a free man of you;--so have your trunk packed, and get ready to set out for Kentuck.
The expense would be nothing, the inconvenience not more; and it was altogether an attention which the delicacy of his conscience pointed out to be requisite to its complete enfranchisement from his promise to his father.
It was the face of a man who was no longer passion's slave, yet who found no advantage in his enfranchisement.
Westmacott's great meeting for the enfranchisement of woman had passed over, and it had been a triumphant success.
Only a minority of First Nations people applied for enfranchisement, especially in this period.
Only this time the threat was emancipation and civil enfranchisement.
On the second topic, which is about the enfranchisement of the tens of thousands of permanent non-Cypriot residents living in Cyprus being enabled to vote for a given President's election -- and this for all sorts of very good reasons -- the approach has again been completely ignored.
Our parliamentary democracy is the product of over 700 years of sometimes glacial and sometimes dramatic reform - Parliament only became truly representative of the people with the full enfranchisement of women in 1928.
At issue is the enfranchisement of historically powerless ethnic and caste groups.
Starring Carey Mulligan and Helena Bonham Carter as early footsoldiers of the feminist movement, it tells the story of the working-class British women who, inspired by suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst (played by Meryl Streep), took their fight for enfranchisement to Westminster.
806 and a section of track from traveling to the border enfranchisement station on the cadastral plot No.