entering


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Related to entering: resubmit, call on, stand pat, stationed

en·ter

 (ĕn′tər)
v. en·tered, en·ter·ing, en·ters
v.tr.
1. To come or go into: The train entered the tunnel.
2. To penetrate; pierce: The bullet entered the victim's skull.
3. To introduce; insert: She entered the probe into the patient's artery.
4.
a. To become a participant, member, or part of; join: too old to enter the army; entered the discussion at a crucial moment.
b. To gain admission to (a school, for example).
5. To cause to become a participant, member, or part of; enroll: entered the children in private school; entered dahlias in a flower show.
6. To embark on; begin: With Sputnik, the Soviet Union entered the space age.
7. To make a beginning in; take up: entered medicine.
8. To write or put in: entered our names in the guest book; enters the data into the computer.
9. To place formally on record; submit: enter a plea of not guilty; enter a complaint.
10. To go to or occupy in order to claim possession of (land).
11. To report (a ship or cargo) to customs.
v.intr.
1. To come or go in; make an entry: As the president entered, the band played "Hail to the Chief."
2. To effect penetration.
3. To become a member or participant.
n.
A key on a keyboard or keypad used to enter or confirm a command or other textual input.
Phrasal Verbs:
enter into
1. To participate in; take an active role or interest in: enter into politics; enter into negotiations.
2. To become party to (a contract): The nations entered into a trade agreement.
3. To become a component of; form a part of: Financial matters entered into the discussion.
4. To consider; investigate: The report entered into the effect of high interest rates on the market.
enter on (or upon)
1. To set out on; begin: We enter on a new era in our history.
2. To begin considering; take up: After discussing the budget deficit, they entered on the problem of raising taxes.
3. To take possession of: She entered upon the estate of her uncle.

[Middle English entren, from Old French entrer, from Latin intrāre, from intrā, inside; see en in Indo-European roots.]

en′ter·a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entering - a movement into or inwardentering - a movement into or inward    
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
encroachment, intrusion, invasion - any entry into an area not previously occupied; "an invasion of tourists"; "an invasion of locusts"
2.entering - the act of entering; "she made a grand entrance"
arrival - the act of arriving at a certain place; "they awaited her arrival"
incursion - the act of entering some territory or domain (often in large numbers); "the incursion of television into the American living room"
intrusion - entrance by force or without permission or welcome
irruption - a sudden violent entrance; a bursting in; "the recent irruption of bad manners"
entree - the act of entering; "she made a graceful entree into the ballroom"
enrollment, enrolment, registration - the act of enrolling
penetration - the act of entering into or through something; "the penetration of upper management by women"
admission, admittance - the act of admitting someone to enter; "the surgery was performed on his second admission to the clinic"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
I should like to look at the creature'; if it is a true Iroquois I can tell him by his knavish look, and by his paint," said the scout; stepping past the charger of Heyward, and entering the path behind the mare of the singing master, whose foal had taken advantage of the halt to exact the maternal contribution.
The river was difficult to cross, and many were killed in the flight, some just entering the river, some in the water, others after crossing in ascending the cliffs.
She turned to a handsome sideboard near the door, and presently faced him again with a decanter of whiskey and a glass in her hand, and a return of the bewitching smile she had worn on entering.
This person--a gray-headed man, of quiet and most respectful deportment --found it necessary to explain that his master still remained in his study, or private apartment; on entering which, an hour before, he had expressed a wish on no account to be disturbed.
The Pyncheons, if all stories were true, haughtily as they bore themselves in the noonday streets of their native town, were no better than bond-servants to these plebeian Maules, on entering the topsy-turvy commonwealth of sleep.
He groped along as stealthily, with as cautious a tread, and as wary an outlook, as a thief entering a chamber where a man lies only half asleep -- or, it may be, broad awake -- with purpose to steal the very treasure which this man guards as the apple of his eye.
It had a careless look, as if it were meant for the uses of the public; so, entering, the first thing I did was to stumble over an ash-box in the porch.
Zoned by those letters you saw the likeness of three Andes' summits; from one a flame; a tower on another; on the third a crowing cock; while arching over all was a segment of the partitioned zodiac, the signs all marked with their usual cabalistics, and the keystone sun entering the equinoctial point at Libra.
Dis yer matter 'bout persistence, feller-niggers," said Sam, with the air of one entering into an abstruse subject, "dis yer 'sistency 's a thing what an't seed into very clar, by most anybody.
I'm entering on my last reform--I know it--yes, and I'll win; but after that, if I ever slip again I'm gone.
Three minutes later the old man and his sons, well armed, were up the hill, and just entering the sumach path on tiptoe, their weapons in their hands.
Far ahead, beyond the bars, she espied the Simpson children just entering the woodsy bit.