enterprise

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en·ter·prise

 (ĕn′tər-prīz′)
n.
1. An undertaking, especially one of some scope, complication, and risk.
2. A business organization.
3. Industrious, systematic activity, especially when directed toward profit: Private enterprise is basic to capitalism.
4. Willingness to undertake new ventures; initiative: "Through want of enterprise and faith men are where they are, buying and selling, and spending their lives like serfs" (Henry David Thoreau).

[Middle English, from Old French entreprise, from past participle of entreprendre, to undertake : entre-, between (from Latin inter-; see inter-) + prendre, to take (from Latin prehendere, prēndere; see ghend- in Indo-European roots).]

en′ter·pris′er n.

enterprise

(ˈɛntəˌpraɪz)
n
1. a project or undertaking, esp one that requires boldness or effort
2. participation in such projects
3. readiness to embark on new ventures; boldness and energy
4. (Commerce)
a. initiative in business
b. (as modifier): the enterprise culture.
5. (Commerce) a business unit; a company or firm
[C15: from Old French entreprise (n), from entreprendre from entre- between (from Latin: inter-) + prendre to take, from Latin prehendere to grasp]
ˈenterˌpriser n

en•ter•prise

(ˈɛn tərˌpraɪz)

n.
1. a project undertaken, esp. one that is important or difficult or requires boldness or energy.
2. a plan for such a project.
3. participation or engagement in such projects.
4. boldness or readiness in undertaking; adventurous spirit or ingenuity.
5. a company organized for commercial purposes; business firm.
6. (cap.) the prototype for the space shuttle, used for atmospheric flight and landing tests.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French, n. use of feminine of entrepris, past participle of entreprendre to undertake, Old French, =entre- inter- + prendre to take (see prize1)]
en′ter•pris`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enterprise - a purposeful or industrious undertaking (especially one that requires effort or boldness); "he had doubts about the whole enterprise"
fraudulent scheme, illegitimate enterprise, racket - an illegal enterprise (such as extortion or fraud or drug peddling or prostitution) carried on for profit
forlorn hope - a hopeless or desperate enterprise
project, task, undertaking, labor - any piece of work that is undertaken or attempted; "he prepared for great undertakings"
business activity, commercial activity - activity undertaken as part of a commercial enterprise
2.enterprise - an organization created for business ventures; "a growing enterprise must have a bold leader"
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
giant - an unusually large enterprise; "Walton built a retail giant"
collective - members of a cooperative enterprise
business, business concern, business organisation, business organization, concern - a commercial or industrial enterprise and the people who constitute it; "he bought his brother's business"; "a small mom-and-pop business"; "a racially integrated business concern"
commercial enterprise - an enterprise connected with commerce
3.enterprise - readiness to embark on bold new ventures
drive - the trait of being highly motivated; "his drive and energy exhausted his co-workers"

enterprise

noun
1. firm, company, business, concern, operation, organization, establishment, commercial undertaking There are plenty of small industrial enterprises.
2. venture, operation, project, adventure, undertaking, programme, pursuit, endeavour Horse breeding is a risky enterprise.

enterprise

noun
1. Something undertaken, especially something requiring extensive planning and work:
2. An exciting, often hazardous undertaking:
3. A commercial organization:
Informal: outfit.
4. An aggressive readiness along with energy to undertake taxing efforts:
Translations
عَزيمَه، روح الإقْداممَشْروع
podnik
foretagendeinitiativvirkelyst
vállalkozó szellem
dirfskaframtak
iniciatyvainiciatyvusišradingumas
iniciatīvapasākumsuzņēmībauzņēmums
podnikavosť
podjetje

enterprise

[ˈentəpraɪz]
A. N
1. (= firm, undertaking) → empresa f
2. (= initiative) → iniciativa f
free enterprisela libre empresa
private enterprisela empresa privada
B. CPD the enterprise culture Nla cultura empresarial
enterprise zone N zona declarada de especial interés para el fomento de actividades empresariales

enterprise

[ˈɛntərpraɪz] n
(= entrepreneurial activity) → entreprise f
He wanted to promote the development of local enterprise → Il a voulu agir pour le développement de l'entreprise dans sa région.
private enterprise → entreprise f privée
(= company, business) → entreprise f
(= venture, undertaking) → entreprise f
(= initiative) → esprit m d'initiative, initiative f

enterprise

n
no pl (= initiative, ingenuity)Initiative f; (= adventurousness)Unternehmungsgeist m
(= project, undertaking, Comm: = firm) → Unternehmen nt; free/public/private enterprise (system) → freies/öffentliches/privates Unternehmertum

enterprise

[ˈɛntəˌpraɪz] n
a. (firm, undertaking, company) → impresa
b. (initiative) → iniziativa

enterprise

(ˈentəpraiz) noun
1. something that is attempted or undertaken (especially if it requires boldness or courage). business enterprises; a completely new enterprise.
2. willingness to try new lines of action. We need someone with enterprise and enthusiasm.
ˈenterprising adjective
(negative unenterprising) full of enterprise; adventurous.
References in classic literature ?
I thought you had too much pride and sense to truckle to any mortal woman just because she wears French boots and rides in a coupe," said Jo, who, being called from the tragic climax of her novel, was not in the best mood for social enterprises.
He is always able to raise capital for new enterprises in Wyoming or Montana, and has helped young men out there to do remarkable things in mines and timber and oil.
There are some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method.
To fill up Liberia with an ignorant, inexperienced, half-barbarized race, just escaped from the chains of slavery, would be only to prolong, for ages, the period of struggle and conflict which attends the inception of new enterprises.
It is true, we are but faint-hearted crusaders, even the walkers, nowadays, who undertake no persevering, never-ending enterprises.
Although my book is intended mainly for the en- tertainment of boys and girls, I hope it will not be shunned by men and women on that account, for part of my plan has been to try to pleasantly remind adults of what they once were themselves, and of how they felt and thought and talked, and what queer enterprises they sometimes engaged in.
If, as was most generally the case, they placed themselves under the protection of any of the petty kings in their vicinity, accepted of feudal offices in his household, or bound themselves by mutual treaties of alliance and protection, to support him in his enterprises, they might indeed purchase temporary repose; but it must be with the sacrifice of that independence which was so dear to every English bosom, and at the certain hazard of being involved as a party in whatever rash expedition the ambition of their protector might lead him to undertake.
The horse that fell was strained in the left shoulder, but the rider got no hurt; and I repaired my handkerchief as well as I could: however, I would not trust to the strength of it any more, in such dangerous enterprises.
Then he went out, into a series of picturesque enterprises, until he had built up a four-square fortune; and recently, in 1907, he came back to be the head of the telephone business, and to complete the work of organization that he started thirty years before.
But when most people are working harder for less, when others cannot work at all, when the cost of health care devastates families and threatens to bankrupt our enterprises, great and small; when the fear of crime robs law abiding citizens of their freedom; and when millions of poor children cannot even imagine the lives we are calling them to lead, we have not made change our friend.
Formerly, an invading army would penetrate into the heart of a neighboring country almost as soon as intelligence of its approach could be received; but now a comparatively small force of disciplined troops, acting on the defensive, with the aid of posts, is able to impede, and finally to frustrate, the enterprises of one much more considerable.
If one nation maintains constantly a disciplined army, ready for the service of ambition or revenge, it obliges the most pacific nations who may be within the reach of its enterprises to take corresponding precautions.