entire


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en·tire

 (ĕn-tīr′)
adj.
1.
a. Having no part excluded or left out; whole: I read the entire book. See Synonyms at whole.
b. Constituting the full amount, extent, or duration: We spent the entire day at the beach.
c. Not broken, decayed, or divided; intact: an old building with its roof entire.
d. With no reservations or limitations; complete: gave us his entire attention.
2. Not castrated.
3. Botany Not having an indented margin: an entire leaf.
4. Archaic Unmixed or unalloyed; pure or homogenous.
n.
1. The whole; the entirety.
2. An uncastrated horse; a stallion.

[Middle English, from Old French entier, from Latin integrum, neuter of integer; see tag- in Indo-European roots.]

en·tire′ness n.

entire

(ɪnˈtaɪə)
adj
1. (prenominal) whole; complete: the entire project is going well.
2. (prenominal) without reservation or exception; total: you have my entire support.
3. not broken or damaged; intact
4. consisting of a single piece or section; undivided; continuous
5. (Botany) (of leaves, petals, etc) having a smooth margin not broken up into teeth or lobes
6. (Zoology) not castrated: an entire horse.
7. obsolete of one substance or kind; unmixed; pure
n
8. a less common word for entirety
9. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) an uncastrated horse
10. (Philately) philately
a. a complete item consisting of an envelope, postcard, or wrapper with stamps affixed
b. on entire (of a stamp) placed on an envelope, postcard, etc, and bearing postal directions
[C14: from Old French entier, from Latin integer whole, from in-1 + tangere to touch]
enˈtireness n

en•tire

(ɛnˈtaɪər)

adj.
1. having all the parts or elements; whole; complete.
2. full or thorough.
3. not broken, mutilated, or decayed; intact.
4. unimpaired or undiminished.
5. being wholly of one piece; undivided; continuous.
6. without notches or indentations, as a leaf.
7. not gelded.
8. Obs. wholly of one kind; unmixed or pure.
n.
9. an ungelded animal, esp. a stallion.
10. Archaic. the whole; entirety.
[1350–1400; Middle English entere < Middle French entier < Latin integrum, acc. of integer whole; see integer]
en•tire′ness, n.
syn: See complete.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entire - uncastrated adult male horseentire - uncastrated adult male horse  
male horse - the male of species Equus caballus
studhorse, stud - adult male horse kept for breeding
Adj.1.entire - constituting the full quantity or extententire - constituting the full quantity or extent; complete; "an entire town devastated by an earthquake"; "gave full attention"; "a total failure"
whole - including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete; "gave his whole attention"; "a whole wardrobe for the tropics"; "the whole hog"; "a whole week"; "the baby cried the whole trip home"; "a whole loaf of bread"
2.entire - constituting the undiminished entirety; lacking nothing essential especially not damaged; "a local motion keepeth bodies integral"- Bacon; "was able to keep the collection entire during his lifetime"; "fought to keep the union intact"
whole - including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete; "gave his whole attention"; "a whole wardrobe for the tropics"; "the whole hog"; "a whole week"; "the baby cried the whole trip home"; "a whole loaf of bread"
3.entire - (of leaves or petals) having a smooth edge; not broken up into teeth or lobes
smooth - of the margin of a leaf shape; not broken up into teeth
4.entire - (used of domestic animals) sexually competent; "an entire horse"
uncastrated - not castrated

entire

adjective
1. continuous, unified, unbroken, uninterrupted, undivided He had spent his entire life in China as a doctor.
2. whole, full, complete, total, gross The entire family was killed in the crash.
3. absolute, full, total, utter, outright, thorough, unqualified, unrestricted, undiminished, unmitigated, unreserved He assured me of his entire confidence in me.
4. intact, whole, perfect, unmarked, unbroken, sound, unharmed, undamaged, without a scratch, unmarred No document is entire, and it is often unclear in what order the pieces fit together.

entire

adjective
1. Including every constituent or individual:
2. Lacking nothing essential or normal:
3. Not more or less:
Translations
كَامِلكامِل، كُل
celý
helhele
koko
čitav
heill, allur
全体の
전체의
ištisasvisuma
pilnīgsviss
całacałecałkowitycały
celoten
fullständig
ทั้งหมด
toàn bộ

entire

[ɪnˈtaɪəʳ] ADJ
1. (= whole) → entero
the entire worldel mundo entero, todo el mundo
she cleaned the entire houselimpió toda la casalimpió la casa entera
he didn't speak throughout the entire eveningno habló en toda la tarde
his entire earnings for a yearla totalidad de sus ingresos anuales
he has my entire confidencetiene toda mi confianza
2. (= complete) → completo
an entire dinner serviceuna vajilla completa

entire

[ɪnˈtaɪər] adj (= whole) [world, country, family] → (tout) entier/ière; [situation] → tout(e) (entier/ière); [life, year, day] → tout(e)
The entire family was staring at him → Toute la famille le regardait.
the entire world → le monde entier
one's entire time
You'll spend your entire time worrying → Tu vas passer tout ton temps à te faire du souci.
the entire time (that)
I had only two conversations the entire time I was there → Je n'ai eu que deux conversations pendant que j'étais là.
the entire time adv (= constantly) → en permanence

entire

adj
(= whole, complete)ganz; cost, careergesamt
(= intact)vollständig
(= uncastrated)nicht kastriert

entire

[ɪnˈtaɪəʳ] adj (whole) → intero/a, tutto/a; (complete) → completo/a, intero/a; (unreserved) → assoluto/a, pieno/a

entire

(inˈtaiə) adjective
whole. I spent the entire day on the beach.
enˈtirely adverb
completely. a house entirely hidden by trees; not entirely satisfactory; entirely different.
enˈtirety (-rəti) noun
completeness.

entire

كَامِل celý hel ganz ολόκληρος entero koko entier čitav intero 全体の 전체의 volledig hel całkowity inteiro целый fullständig ทั้งหมด bütün toàn bộ 全部的

en·tire

a. entero-a, completo-a, íntegro-a;
adv. completamente, del todo, totalmente.
References in classic literature ?
The Prologue is that entire part of a tragedy which precedes the Parode of thc Chorus.
As the least tangle or kink in the coiling would, in running out, infallibly take somebody's arm, leg, or entire body off, the utmost precaution is used in stowing the line in its tub.
But these unfailing signs of the supernatural are partly concealed and greatly softened by the abundant foliage of a large vine overrunning the entire structure.
This would have been the case in the constitution examined by him, if the king, who is the sole executive magistrate, had possessed also the complete legislative power, or the supreme administration of justice; or if the entire legislative body had possessed the supreme judiciary, or the supreme executive authority.
We were agreed that the one statement most difficult of explanation was that which reported the entire absence of human young among the various tribes which Tyler had had intercourse.
So, too, it is better to recapture an army entire than to destroy it, to capture a regiment, a detachment or a company entire than to destroy them.
Each was eclipsed but an instant, and only a few at the same time, but along the entire length of the ridge all that were within a degree or two of the crest were blotted out.
In point of fact, in its apogee the moon is 247,552 miles, and in its perigee, 218,657 miles only distant; a fact which makes a difference of 28,895 miles, or more than one-ninth of the entire distance.
Speaker, I have heard with profound attention and entire approval the explanation of the honourable member, and wish to offer a few remarks on my own behalf.
Pontellier most forcibly was their entire absence of prudery.
That same infinitely thin, isinglass substance, which, I admit, invests the entire body of the whale, is not so much to be regarded as the skin of the creature, as the skin of the skin, so to speak; for it were simply ridiculous to say, that the proper skin of the tremendous whale is thinner and more tender than the skin of a new-born child.
An entire consolidation of the States into one complete national sovereignty would imply an entire subordination of the parts; and whatever powers might remain in them, would be altogether dependent on the general will.