entreat


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Related to entreat: jocose, lissome, engrafted

en·treat

 (ĕn-trēt′)
v. en·treat·ed, en·treat·ing, en·treats
v.tr.
1. To make an earnest request of (someone). See Synonyms at beg.
2. To ask for earnestly; petition for: "She made a hasty gesture with her hand, as if to entreat my patience and my silence" (Charles Dickens).
3. Archaic To deal with; treat.
v.intr.
To make an earnest request or petition.

[Middle English entreten, from Anglo-Norman entreter : en-, causative pref.; see en-1 + treter, to treat; see treat.]

en·treat′ing·ly adv.
en·treat′ment n.

entreat

(ɪnˈtriːt) or

intreat

vb
1. to ask (a person) earnestly; beg or plead with; implore
2. to make an earnest request or petition for (something)
3. an archaic word for treat4
[C15: from Old French entraiter, from en-1 + traiter to treat]
enˈtreatingly, inˈtreatingly adv
enˈtreatment, inˈtreatment n

en•treat

(ɛnˈtrit)

v.t.
1. to ask (a person) earnestly; beseech; implore; beg.
2. to ask earnestly for (something).
v.i.
3. to make an earnest request or petition.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French entrait(i)er]
en•treat′ing•ly, adv.
en•treat′ment, n.

entreat


Past participle: entreated
Gerund: entreating

Imperative
entreat
entreat
Present
I entreat
you entreat
he/she/it entreats
we entreat
you entreat
they entreat
Preterite
I entreated
you entreated
he/she/it entreated
we entreated
you entreated
they entreated
Present Continuous
I am entreating
you are entreating
he/she/it is entreating
we are entreating
you are entreating
they are entreating
Present Perfect
I have entreated
you have entreated
he/she/it has entreated
we have entreated
you have entreated
they have entreated
Past Continuous
I was entreating
you were entreating
he/she/it was entreating
we were entreating
you were entreating
they were entreating
Past Perfect
I had entreated
you had entreated
he/she/it had entreated
we had entreated
you had entreated
they had entreated
Future
I will entreat
you will entreat
he/she/it will entreat
we will entreat
you will entreat
they will entreat
Future Perfect
I will have entreated
you will have entreated
he/she/it will have entreated
we will have entreated
you will have entreated
they will have entreated
Future Continuous
I will be entreating
you will be entreating
he/she/it will be entreating
we will be entreating
you will be entreating
they will be entreating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been entreating
you have been entreating
he/she/it has been entreating
we have been entreating
you have been entreating
they have been entreating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been entreating
you will have been entreating
he/she/it will have been entreating
we will have been entreating
you will have been entreating
they will have been entreating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been entreating
you had been entreating
he/she/it had been entreating
we had been entreating
you had been entreating
they had been entreating
Conditional
I would entreat
you would entreat
he/she/it would entreat
we would entreat
you would entreat
they would entreat
Past Conditional
I would have entreated
you would have entreated
he/she/it would have entreated
we would have entreated
you would have entreated
they would have entreated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.entreat - ask for or request earnestlyentreat - ask for or request earnestly; "The prophet bid all people to become good persons"
plead - appeal or request earnestly; "I pleaded with him to stop"

entreat

verb beg, ask, appeal to, petition, pray to, conjure, request, plead with, exhort, implore, enjoin, beseech, importune, ask earnestly, supplicate They entreated the audience to stay calm.

entreat

verb
To make an earnest or urgent request:
Archaic: conjure.
Translations
يَتَوَسَّل إلى، يَتَضَرَّع
bedebønfaldetrygle
biîja innilega
maldavimas
ļoti lūgtlūgties

entreat

[ɪnˈtriːt] VTrogar, suplicar
to entreat sb to do sthsuplicar a algn que haga algo

entreat

[ɪnˈtriːt] vt (= beg) → supplier
to entreat sb to do sth → supplier qn de faire qch

entreat

vtinständig or dringend bitten, anflehen (for um); listen to him, I entreat youich bitte Sie inständig or ich flehe Sie an, ihn anzuhören

entreat

[ɪnˈtriːt] vt to entreat sb (to do sth)implorare or supplicare qn (di fare qc)

entreat

(inˈtriːt) verb
to ask (a person) earnestly and seriously (to do something).
enˈtreaty nounplural enˈtreaties
(an) earnest request or plea.
References in classic literature ?
Of course Edna would like to hear Mademoiselle Reisz play; but she feared it would be useless to entreat her.
After a suitable and decent pause, the principal chiefs arose, and, approaching the patriarch, they placed his hands reverently on their heads, seeming to entreat a blessing.
And, therefore, since we have been unfortunate enough to introduce our heroine at so inauspicious a juncture, we would entreat for a mood of due solemnity in the spectators of her fate.
Then I entreat you, tell me if to the best of your own convictions, this story is in substance really true?
She instantly begged her sister would entreat Lady Middleton to take them home, as she was too miserable to stay a minute longer.
You--poor and obscure, and small and plain as you are--I entreat to accept me as a husband.
Vanstone should take place -whether it is only an improvement for the time, or whether it is the permanent improvement for which we all hope -- in either case I entreat you to let me know of it immediately.
The gentleman was serious immediately, and looked at me, I thought, as if he would entreat me to say nothing about the window.
I had pretended with myself that there was nothing of this taint in the arrangement; but when I went up to my little room on this last night, I felt compelled to admit that it might be so, and had an impulse upon me to go down again and entreat Joe to walk with me in the morning.
Yet, father, let me entreat you by the vow you have taken on you,'' replied the suppliant, ``not to leave the oppressed and endangered without counsel or succour.
Upon the strength of this reasoning, I ventured to address them in the following manner: "Gentlemen, if you be conjurers, as I have good cause to believe, you can understand my language; therefore I make bold to let your worships know that I am a poor distressed Englishman, driven by his misfortunes upon your coast; and I entreat one of you to let me ride upon his back, as if he were a real horse, to some house or village where I can be relieved.
We were not, replied I, in danger of being stabbed or poisoned, but are doomed to a more lingering and painful death by that prohibition which obliges your subjects to deny us the necessaries of life; if it be Your Highness's pleasure that we die here, we entreat that we may at least be despatched quickly, and not condemned to longer torments.