entreaty


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en·treat·y

 (ĕn-trē′tē)
n. pl. en·treat·ies
An earnest request or petition.

entreaty

(ɪnˈtriːtɪ)
n, pl -treaties
an earnest request or petition; supplication; plea

en•treat•y

(ɛnˈtri ti)

n., pl. -treat•ies.
earnest request or petition.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entreaty - earnest or urgent requestentreaty - earnest or urgent request; "an entreaty to stop the fighting"; "an appeal for help"; "an appeal to the public to keep calm"
asking, request - the verbal act of requesting
adjuration - a solemn and earnest appeal to someone to do something
demagoguery, demagogy - impassioned appeals to the prejudices and emotions of the populace
plea, supplication - a humble request for help from someone in authority
solicitation - an entreaty addressed to someone of superior status; "a solicitation to the king for relief"
suit - a petition or appeal made to a person of superior status or rank
courting, courtship, wooing, suit - a man's courting of a woman; seeking the affections of a woman (usually with the hope of marriage); "its was a brief and intense courtship"

entreaty

noun plea, appeal, suit, request, prayer, petition, exhortation, solicitation, supplication, importunity, earnest request They have resisted all entreaties to pledge their support for the campaign.

entreaty

noun
An earnest or urgent request:
Translations
تَوَسُّل، تَضَرُّع إلى
anmodningbøn
vetoomus
sárbeiîni
ricayalvarış

entreaty

[ɪnˈtriːtɪ] Nsúplica f, ruego m
they ignored our entreatieshicieron caso omiso de nuestras súplicas or nuestros ruegos
a look of entreatyuna mirada suplicante

entreaty

[ɪnˈtriːti] nsupplication f, prière f

entreaty

ndringende or flehentliche Bitte; they resisted my entreatiessie blieben gegen alle meine Bitten taub; a look of entreatyein flehender Blick; a gesture of entreatyeine flehende Gebärde

entreaty

[ɪnˈtriːtɪ] nsupplica
a look of entreaty → uno sguardo supplichevole
at his earnest entreaty → dietro sua viva supplica

entreat

(inˈtriːt) verb
to ask (a person) earnestly and seriously (to do something).
enˈtreaty nounplural enˈtreaties
(an) earnest request or plea.
References in classic literature ?
Her glance wandered from his face away toward the Gulf, whose sonorous murmur reached her like a loving but imperative entreaty.
She took her seat, and held forth her arms for her sister, with an air of entreaty and love that even the Huron could not deny.
For the instant, it appeared doubtful whether it were not the Judge's resolute purpose to set Hepzibah aside, and step across the threshold into the parlor, whence issued that broken and miserable murmur of entreaty.
In reply to her mother's command and entreaty that she would behave more decorously, little Pearl paused gather the prickly burrs from a tall burdock which grew beside the tomb.
Only the silence of the boat was at intervals startlingly pierced by one of his peculiar whispers, now harsh with command, now soft with entreaty.
Not reasoning; not remonstrance; not entreaty wilt thou hearken to; all this thou scornest.
Her husband and children were her entire world, and in these she ruled more by entreaty and persuasion than by command or argument.
Compressed into it is a whole Alexandrian library of thought, feeling, and sentiment--all that can, all that need be urged, in the form of expostulation, entreaty, rebuke, against that crime of crimes,--making man the prop- erty of his fellow-man
Dashwood feel this ungracious behaviour, and so earnestly did she despise her daughter-in-law for it, that, on the arrival of the latter, she would have quitted the house for ever, had not the entreaty of her eldest girl induced her first to reflect on the propriety of going, and her own tender love for all her three children determined her afterwards to stay, and for their sakes avoid a breach with their brother.
It appeared dry and cold; but at the bottom was dotted in with pencil an obscure apology, and an entreaty for kind remembrance and reconciliation, if her proceeding had offended him: asserting that she could not help it then, and being done, she had now no power to repeal it.
But the wishes of Miss Magdalen Vanstone's eldest sister have claims on my consideration which I cannot dispute; and at her entreaty I inform you that all further proceedings on my part are withdrawn -- on the express understanding that this concession is to open facilities for written communication, at least, between the two sisters.
He had returned when he did, on the pressing and written entreaty of a French citizen, who represented that his life was endangered by his absence.