entrepreneur

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en·tre·pre·neur

 (ŏn′trə-prə-nûr′, -no͝or′)
n.
A person who organizes, operates, and assumes the risk for a business venture.

[French, from Old French, from entreprendre, to undertake; see enterprise.]

en′tre·pre·neur′i·al adj.
en′tre·pre·neur′i·al·ism, en′tre·pre·neur′ism n.
en′tre·pre·neur′ship′ n.

entrepreneur

(ˌɒntrəprəˈnɜː; French ɑ̃trəprənœr)
n
1. (Professions) the owner or manager of a business enterprise who, by risk and initiative, attempts to make profits
2. (Professions) a middleman or commercial intermediary
[C19: from French, from entreprendre to undertake; see enterprise]
ˌentrepreˈneurial adj
ˌentrepreˈneurship n

en•tre•pre•neur

(ˌɑn trə prəˈnɜr, -ˈnʊər, -ˈnyʊər, ɑ̃ˌ-)

n.
a person who organizes and manages an enterprise, esp. a business, usu. with considerable initiative.
[1875–80; < French: literally, one who undertakes (some task) <entrepren(dre) to undertake (see enterprise)]
en`tre•pre•neur′i•al, adj.
en`tre•pre•neur′i•al•ly, adv.
en`tre•pre•neur′i•al•ism, en`tre•pre•neur′ism, n.
en`tre•pre•neur′ship, n.

entrepreneur

1. A French word meaning someone who undertakes something, used to mean someone who owns or runs a business.
2. Someone who risks their own capital in a business enterprise.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entrepreneur - someone who organizes a business venture and assumes the risk for itentrepreneur - someone who organizes a business venture and assumes the risk for it
bourgeois, businessperson - a capitalist who engages in industrial commercial enterprise

entrepreneur

noun businessman or businesswoman, tycoon, director, executive, contractor, industrialist, financier, speculator, magnate, impresario, business executive the flamboyant British entrepreneur Richard Branson

entrepreneur

noun
One that creates, founds, or originates:
Translations
مُقاوِل، مُبادِر تِجاري
podnikatel
entreprenøriværksætter
UnternehmerEntrepreneur
yrittäjä
vállalkozó
athafnamaîur; verktaki; atvinnurekandi
iniciatyvus verslininkas
uzņēmējdarbības organizators
podnikateľ

entrepreneur

[ˌɒntrəprəˈnɜːʳ] N (Comm) → empresario/a m/f (Fin) → capitalista mf

entrepreneur

[ˌɒntrəprəˈnɜːr] nentrepreneur m

entrepreneur

nUnternehmer(in) m(f)

entrepreneur

[ˌɒntrəprəˈnɜːʳ] nimprenditore/trice

entrepreneur

(ontrəprəˈnəː) noun
a person who starts or organizes a business company, especially one involving risk. What this company needs is a real entrepreneur.
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The rise of independent retailers is testament to the wave of entrepreneurialism sweeping the UK.

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