enunciate

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e·nun·ci·ate

 (ĭ-nŭn′sē-āt′)
v. e·nun·ci·at·ed, e·nun·ci·at·ing, e·nun·ci·ates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce; articulate.
2. To state or set forth precisely or systematically: enunciate a doctrine.
3. To announce; proclaim.
v.intr.
To pronounce words; speak aloud.

[Latin ēnūntiāre, ēnūntiāt- : ē-, ex-, ex- + nūntiāre, to announce (from nūntius, messenger; see neu- in Indo-European roots).]

e·nun′ci·a·ble (-ə-bəl) adj.
e·nun′ci·a′tion n.
e·nun′ci·a′tive (-sē-ā′tĭv, -sē-ə-tĭv) adj.
e·nun′ci·a′tive·ly adv.
e·nun′ci·a′tor n.

enunciate

(ɪˈnʌnsɪˌeɪt)
vb
1. (Rhetoric) to articulate or pronounce (words), esp clearly and distinctly
2. (tr) to state precisely or formally
[C17: from Latin ēnuntiāre to declare, from nuntiāre to announce, from nuntius messenger]
eˌnunciˈation n
eˈnunciative, eˈnunciatory adj
eˈnunciatively adv
eˈnunciˌator n

e•nun•ci•ate

(ɪˈnʌn siˌeɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing. v.t.
1. to utter or pronounce, esp. in an articulate or a particular manner: to enunciate the words clearly.
2. to state or declare definitely, as a theory.
3. to announce or proclaim.
v.i.
4. to pronounce words, esp. in an articulate manner.
[1615–25; < Latin ēnūntiātus (past participle of ēnūntiāre) =ē- e- + nūnti(us) messenger, message + -ātus -ate1]
e•nun′ci•a•ble, adj.
e•nun`ci•a′tion, n.
e•nun′ci•a`tor, n.

enunciate

- Derives from Latin nuntius, "messenger."
See also related terms for messenger.

enunciate


Past participle: enunciated
Gerund: enunciating

Imperative
enunciate
enunciate
Present
I enunciate
you enunciate
he/she/it enunciates
we enunciate
you enunciate
they enunciate
Preterite
I enunciated
you enunciated
he/she/it enunciated
we enunciated
you enunciated
they enunciated
Present Continuous
I am enunciating
you are enunciating
he/she/it is enunciating
we are enunciating
you are enunciating
they are enunciating
Present Perfect
I have enunciated
you have enunciated
he/she/it has enunciated
we have enunciated
you have enunciated
they have enunciated
Past Continuous
I was enunciating
you were enunciating
he/she/it was enunciating
we were enunciating
you were enunciating
they were enunciating
Past Perfect
I had enunciated
you had enunciated
he/she/it had enunciated
we had enunciated
you had enunciated
they had enunciated
Future
I will enunciate
you will enunciate
he/she/it will enunciate
we will enunciate
you will enunciate
they will enunciate
Future Perfect
I will have enunciated
you will have enunciated
he/she/it will have enunciated
we will have enunciated
you will have enunciated
they will have enunciated
Future Continuous
I will be enunciating
you will be enunciating
he/she/it will be enunciating
we will be enunciating
you will be enunciating
they will be enunciating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been enunciating
you have been enunciating
he/she/it has been enunciating
we have been enunciating
you have been enunciating
they have been enunciating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been enunciating
you will have been enunciating
he/she/it will have been enunciating
we will have been enunciating
you will have been enunciating
they will have been enunciating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been enunciating
you had been enunciating
he/she/it had been enunciating
we had been enunciating
you had been enunciating
they had been enunciating
Conditional
I would enunciate
you would enunciate
he/she/it would enunciate
we would enunciate
you would enunciate
they would enunciate
Past Conditional
I would have enunciated
you would have enunciated
he/she/it would have enunciated
we would have enunciated
you would have enunciated
they would have enunciated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.enunciate - speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way; "She pronounces French words in a funny way"; "I cannot say `zip wire'"; "Can the child sound out this complicated word?"
twang - pronounce with a nasal twang
devoice - utter with tense vocal chords
raise - pronounce (vowels) by bringing the tongue closer to the roof of the mouth; "raise your `o'"
lilt - articulate in a very careful and rhythmic way
palatalise, palatalize - pronounce a consonant with the tongue against the palate
nasalise, nasalize - pronounce with a lowered velum; "She nasalizes all her vowels"
nasalise, nasalize - speak nasally or through the nose; "In this part of the country, people tend to nasalize"
mispronounce, misspeak - pronounce a word incorrectly; "She mispronounces many Latinate words"
aspirate - pronounce with aspiration; of stop sounds
vocalize, voice, vocalise, sound - utter with vibrating vocal chords
retroflex - articulate (a consonant) with the tongue curled back against the palate; "Indian accents can be characterized by the fact that speakers retroflex their consonants"
subvocalise, subvocalize - articulate without making audible sounds; "she was reading to herself and merely subvocalized"
syllabise, syllabize - utter with distinct articulation of each syllable; "The poet syllabized the verses he read"
drawl - lengthen and slow down or draw out; "drawl one's vowels"
labialise, labialize, round - pronounce with rounded lips
lisp - speak with a lisp
accent, accentuate, stress - put stress on; utter with an accent; "In Farsi, you accent the last syllable of each word"
vowelise, vowelize, vocalise, vocalize - pronounce as a vowel; "between two consonants, this liquid is vowelized"
click - produce a click; "Xhosa speakers click"
trill - pronounce with a trill, of the phoneme `r'; "Some speakers trill their r's"
sibilate - pronounce with an initial sibilant
flap - pronounce with a flap, of alveolar sounds
explode - cause to burst as a result of air pressure; of stop consonants like /p/, /t/, and /k/
roll - pronounce with a roll, of the phoneme /r/; "She rolls her r's"
2.enunciate - express or state clearlyenunciate - express or state clearly    
say, state, tell - express in words; "He said that he wanted to marry her"; "tell me what is bothering you"; "state your opinion"; "state your name"

enunciate

verb
1. pronounce, say, speak, voice, sound, utter, articulate, vocalize, enounce (formal) She enunciated each word slowly and carefully.
2. state, declare, proclaim, pronounce, publish, promulgate, propound He was always ready to enunciate his views to anyone who would listen.

enunciate

verb
1. To produce or make (speech sounds):
2. To declare by way of a systematic statement:
Translations
يُعْلِن ، يَلْفُظ بِوُضوح
artikulereudtale
ääntäälausua
bera fram
aiškus tarimas
skaidri izrunāt
söylemektelâffuz etmek

enunciate

[ɪˈnʌnsɪeɪt] VT [+ word, sound] → pronunciar, articular; [+ theory, idea] → enunciar

enunciate

[ɪˈnʌnsieɪt]
vt
[+ word] → prononcer
[+ thought, idea, plan] → énoncer, exposer
viarticuler

enunciate

vtiartikulieren

enunciate

[ɪˈnʌnsɪeɪt] vt (words) → articolare, pronunciare; (sound) → articolare; (theory, idea) → enunciare, esporre

enunciate

(iˈnansieit) verb
to pronounce clearly and distinctly. He carefully enunciated each syllable of the word.
eˌnunciˈation noun
References in classic literature ?
As Clennam had a purpose in remaining, he said what he could responsive to these sentiments, and stood at the window with their enunciator, while Maggy and her Little Mother washed the tea- service and cleared it away.
It is not that long ago that most of us can remember when street curb crossings had no drops for those in wheelchairs; that enunciators were not used in elevators to help the blind to locate their floor; that cochlear implants were not available for the individuals with severe hearing limitations; and computer generated vocalization aids were unavailable.
Vowels, then, become partners in resonance, not just enunciators, and they adjust to the needs of pitch and volume.
They are the enunciators of a dynamic ethnic identity.
24] The monstrously emphasized and visible cut in Rope challenges the viewer's sense of total mastery over the visual scene by exposing such a sense of mastery as entirely dependent on never seeing the cut, never noticing the sheer artificiality of film, immersing oneself so totally in the filmic experience that we never realize that we have been, at all points, manipulated and conditioned by technicians skilled in the arts of performance and masquerade, which the lovers of this film, with a woeful lack of self-perception, believe themselves to be as well, one aspect of their status as Hitchcock stand-ins or enunciators.
Acosta was one of the major authorities on New World reality in Cervantes's day, and one of its chief enunciators of a Ptolemaic cosmography in his Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590).
to constantly stimulate, around a clear and well defined positioning, the narrative of Bucharest's story, on multiple levels, with multiple enunciators and, thus, stimulating the financial participation of existent private actors in the locale.
In constructing this "scenography" the two enunciators do not ignore the pre-discursive reality but use it as a departing point during the argumentation: terrorism and the European answer to it--the intercultural and interreligious dialogue--are the two basic elements of the discourse.
The text is like a mirror, since it shows who the enunciators are and how they act in it.
These conditions impose on the enunciators a certain amount of rules to be complied with, since "none shall enter the order of discourse if they do not satisfy certain requirements or if they are not qualified to do so from the outset" (FOUCAULT, 2009, p.
Some postmodernists conceptualize the past not unlike Kant's noumena: inaccessible and filtered through categories that often transcended their enunciators.
It is as if the enunciation of social discourses converts the latter into voices, and our bodies, the initial enunciators, into dialogic subjects with social identities, that is, participants in the ongoing interplay among the voices of what we will call the "multivoiced body.