enured


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in·ure

also en·ure (ĭn-yo͝or′)
tr.v. in·ured, in·ur·ing, in·ures also en·ured or en·ur·ing or en·ures
To habituate to something undesirable, especially by prolonged subjection; accustom: "Though the food became no more palatable, he soon became sufficiently inured to it" (John Barth).

[Middle English, back-formation from enured, customary, from in ure : in, in; see in1 + ure, use (from Old French euvre, uevre, work, from Latin opera, activity associated with work; see op- in Indo-European roots).]

in·ure′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.enured - made tough by habitual exposure; "hardened fishermen"; "a peasant, dark, lean-faced, wind-inured"- Robert Lynd; "our successors...may be graver, more inured and equable men"- V.S.Pritchett
toughened, tough - physically toughened; "the tough bottoms of his feet"
References in classic literature ?
By suffering her to do whatever she pleases, I have enured her to a habit of being pleased to do whatever I like.
Bomb disposal staff will remain alert while special monitoring of railway tracks will be enured.
IT beggars belief - or would do if we were not so enured to our leaders' betrayal of Britain - that the government is planning to further cut our armed forces.